Digital Marketing News: More Constantly Online, Google’s Digital Graffiti, AI’s Big Data Push

Roughly one in four Americans is online ‘constantly’ according to new Pew Research Center survey data.

Roughly One in Four Americans is Online ‘Constantly’
More than a quarter of U.S. adults consider themselves online “almost constantly” according to survey data recently released by the Pew Research Center, a figure that jumps to nearly 39 percent for younger people in the 18-to-29-year-old age group, and Kurt Wagner looks closely at some of the survey’s fascinating statistics. Recode

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Facebook Introduces ‘Store Sales Optimization’ and Other Ad Improvements for Retailers
Facebook has added three new options for retailers, announcing its expanded store sales optimization, tabs for Canvas, and product categories for dynamic ads, all aimed at improving mobile and offline conversions. Greg Sterling takes a look at some of the details. Marketing Land

Twitter to Prohibit Range of Cryptocurrency Ads
Sky News reports that Twitter has plans to eventually ban advertisements for cryptocurrencies, token sales, and initial coin offerings (ICOs), in a move that would follow similar policies implemented by both Facebook and Google this year. Sky News

Data Suggests Surprising Shift: Duopoly Not All-Powerful – Amazon and Snapchat Are Experiencing Faster Growth
Amazon and Snapchat are among the firms making faster-than-expected gains into Facebook and Google’s substantial shares of digital ad spending, according to new data. eMarketer

An AI-Driven Big Data Catalog Will Impact B2B Sales — And It’s Closer Than You Think
Combining artificial intelligence with big data can be an unbeatable approach to B2B marketing, and Larry Myler takes an in-depth look at this powerhouse combo. Forbes

Programmatic Adtech for B2B Marketers
Investment in programmatic adtech among B2B advertisers has increased due to better predictive analytics and attribution and advancements in data management, and Chitra Iyer examines six reasons why. MarTech Advisor

Advertisers Can Now Target Quora Users Via Their Email Address
Question-and-answer service Quora has added a feature allowing marketers to target its users by e-mail, with its new List Match Audience update announced recently, expanding on the firm’s advertising platform. Jess Nelson has details. MediaPost

Pinterest Expands Shopping Ads For Retailers
After graduating from a pilot program, Pinterest is rolling out its “Shopping Ads” advertising platform, bringing more ad types and campaign management features to retailers in the comiung months. Product catalogs and showcase items that can be shown in context are among the program’s new offerings. AdAge

Google’s New Experiment Lets You Tag Digital Graffiti In The Real World
With the release of an experimental app called Just a Line, Google has made it possible to create and tag 3D graffiti in augmented reality, paving the way for some potential creative marketing uses. FastCoDesign

Facebook Pilots Program to Help Creators Build Advertiser Relationships & Drive Fan Engagement
A new Facebook pilot initiative that hopes to both drive fan engagement and boost revenue for creators has been announced, allowing an “In App Purchase” label in the App Store and on Google Play. Marketing Land

ON THE LIGHTER SIDE:

The Customer Journey
Take a look at mapping the customer journey – Marketoonist

How a Copywriter’s Amazing Tribute to Sprite Got Him Hired at W+K – AdWeek

How brands have used satire in advertising – Econsultancy

TOPRANK MARKETING & CLIENTS IN THE NEWS:

  • Lee Odden – Interview with Lee Odden, Pubcon Florida 2018 Keynote — Pubcon
  • Alex Rynne of LinkedIin (client) and Lee Odden – B2BMX 2018 – THE B2B Marketing event that helps you define your voice – Netline
  • Lee Odden – The Evolution of Influencer Marketing: A #CMWorld Chat with Lee Odden – Content Marketing Institute
  • Lee Odden – How to Tame Agency Work Chaos – Workfront
  • Lee Odden – Winning B2B marketing campaigns — LinkedIn Pulse
  • Lee Odden – 20 Inspiring Digital Marketing Experts That You Need to Know — Vbout
  • Lee Odden – 9 Business Experts You Should Be Following on Facebook — AllBusiness

Be sure to check in next week, when we’ll be sharing all new marketing news stories, or you can follow us at @toprank on Twitter for even more timely daily news. Also, don’t miss the full video summary on our TopRank Marketing TV YouTube Channel.

The Campaign Comeback: What to Do When Content Fails – Whiteboard Friday

We’ve all been there: you plan, launch, and eagerly await the many returns on a content campaign, only to be disappointed when it falls flat. But all is not lost: there are clever ways to give your failed campaigns a second chance at life and an opportunity to earn the links you missed out on the first time. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, we’re delighted to welcome guest host Shannon McGuirk as she graciously gives us a five-step plan for breathing new life into a dead content campaign.

What to do when content fails.

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Hi, Moz fans. Welcome to this edition of Whiteboard Friday. My name is Shannon McGuirk. I’m the Head of PR and Content at a UK-based digital marketing agency called Aira.

Now, throughout my time, I’ve launched a number of creative content and digital PR campaigns, too many to mention. But the ones that really stick into my head are the campaign fails, the ones that got away from the link numbers that I wanted to achieve and the ones that were quite painful from the client-side and stakeholder-side.

Now, over the last couple of years, I’ve built up a couple of steps and tactics that essentially will help me get campaigns back on track, and I wanted to take you through them today. So, today, I’m going to be talking to you about content campaign comebacks and what to do if your content campaign fails.

Step one: Reevaluate your outreach efforts

Now, take it right back to when you first launched the campaign.

  • Have you contacted the right journalists?
  • Have you gone to the right publications?
  • Be realistic. Now, at this point, remember to be realistic. It might not be a good idea to start going for the likes of ABC News and The Daily Telegraph. Bring it down a level, go to industry blogs, more niche publications, the ones that you’re more likely to get traction with.
  • Do your research. Essentially, is what I’m saying.
  • Less is always more in my eyes. I’ve seen prospecting and media lists that have up to 500 contacts on there that have fired out blank, cold outreach emails. For me, that’s a boo-boo. I would rather have 50 people on that media list that I know their first name, I know the last three articles that they’ve written, and on top of that, I can tell you which publications they’ve been at, so I know what they’re interested in. It’s going to really increase your chances of success when you relaunch.

Step two: Stories vs. statements

So this is when you need to start thinking about stories versus statements. Strip it right back and start to think about that hook or that angle that your whole campaign is all about. Can you say this in one sentence? If you can get it in one sentence, amazing because that’s the core thing that you are going to be communicating to journalists.

Now, to make this really tangible so that you can understand what I’m saying, I’ve got an example of a statement versus a story for a recent campaign that we did for an automotive client of ours. So here’s my example of a statement. “Client X found that the most dangerous roads in the UK are X, Y, Z.” That’s the statement. Now, for the story, let’s spice it up a little bit. “New data reveals that 8 out of 10 of the most dangerous roads in the UK are in London as cyclist deaths reach an all-time high.”

Can you see the difference between a story and a statement? I’m latching it into something in society that’s really important at the moment, because cyclist deaths are reaching an all-time high. On top of that, I’m giving it a punchy stat straightaway and then tying it into the city of London.

Step three: Create a package

So this seems like a bit of a no-brainer and a really obvious one, but it’s so incredibly important when you’re trying to bring your content campaign back from the dead. Think about creating a package. We all know that journalists are up against tight deadlines. They have KPIs in terms of the articles that they need to churn out on a daily basis. So give them absolutely everything that they need to cover your campaign.

I’ve put together a checklist for you, and you can tick them off as you go down.

  • Third-party expert or opinion. If you’re doing something around health and nutrition, why don’t you go out and find a doctor or a nutritionist that can give you comment for free — because remember, you’ll be doing the hard work for their PR team — to include within any press releases that you’re going to be writing.
  • Make sure that your data and your methodology is watertight. Prepare a methodology statement and also get all of your data and research into a Google sheet that you can share with journalists in a really open and transparent way.
  • Press release. It seems really simple, but get a well-written press release or piece of supporting copy written out well ahead of the relaunch timing so that you’ve got assets to be able to give a journalist. They can take snippets of that copy, mold it, adapt it, and then create their own article off the back of it.
  • New designs & images. If you’ve been working on any new designs and images, pop them on a Google shared drive and share that with the press. They can dip into this guide as and when they need it and ensure that they’ve got a visual element for their potential article.
  • Exclusive options. One final thing here that can occasionally get overlooked is you want to be holding something back. Whether that’s some really important stats, a comment from the MD or the CEO, or just some extra designs or images for graphics, I would keep them in your back pocket, because you may get the odd journalist at a really high DA/authority publication, such as the Mail Online or The Telegraph, ask for something exclusive on behalf of their editor.

Step four: Ask an expert

Start to think about working with journalists and influencers in a different way than just asking them to cover your creative content campaigns and generate links. Establish a solid network of freelance journalists that you can ask directly for feedback on any ideas. Now, it can be any aspect of the idea that you’re asking for their feedback on. You can go for data, pitch angles, launch timings, design and images. It doesn’t really matter. But they know what that killer angle and hook needs to be to write an article and essentially get you a link. So tap into it and ask them what they think about your content campaign before you relaunch.

Step five: Re-launch timings

This is the one thing that you need to consider just before the relaunch, but it’s the relaunch timings. Did you actually pay enough attention to this when you did your first initial launch? Chances are you may not have, and something has slipped through the net here.

  • Awareness days. So be sure to check awareness days. Now, this can be anything from National Proposal Day for a wedding client, or it can be the Internet of Things Day for a bigger electrical firm or something like that. It doesn’t really matter. But if you can hook it onto an awareness day, it means that there’s already going to be that interest in the media, journalists will be writing about the topic, and there’s a way in for your content.
  • World events. Again, keep in mind anything to do with elections or perhaps world disasters, such as tornadoes and bad weather, because it means that the press is going to be heavily oversaturated with anything to do with them, and therefore you might want to hold back on your relaunch until the dust is settled and giving your content campaign the best chance of success in round two.
  • Seasonality. Now, this isn’t just Christmas. It’s also Easter, Mother’s Day, Valentine’s Day. Think about the time of year you’re launching and whether your content campaign is actually relevant at that time of year. For example, back home in the UK, we don’t tend to launch content campaigns in the run-up to Christmas if it’s not Christmas content, because it’s not relevant and the press are already interested in that one seasonal thing.
  • Holidays. Holidays in the sense of half-term and summer holidays, because it means that journalists won’t be in the office, and therefore you’re reducing your chances of success when you’re calling them or when you’re writing out your emails to pitch them.

So there are my five steps for your content campaign comebacks. I know you’ve all been there too, guys, and I would love to hear how you got over some of these hurdles in bringing your content campaigns back to life. Feel free to comment below. I hope you guys join me soon for another Whiteboard Friday. Thanks.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com