4 Marketing Productivity Tips from Workfront’s Mike Riding #DSMPLS

Mike Riding of Workfront at Digital Summit Minneapolis

Mike Riding of Workfront at Digital Summit Minneapolis

Does work follow you home?  When was the last time you had a work week that was actually 40 hours? 

Marketers often feel pressed for time and overworked. In fact, according to recent Workfront research:

  • 64% say they’re being asked to come up with new ways of working
  • 58% are so swamped, they don’t have time to think beyond their daily tasks
  • 56% they’re completely overwhelmed. 

Mike Riding, Workfront’s Director of Digital Marketing, came to Digital Summit Minneapolis with the sole goal of helping marketers get more work done. While organizations typically turn to technology to solve the productivity problem, Mike offered four actionable, process-driven ways marketers can modernize their work and become more productive. 

Read on to discover Mike’s work world where marketers don’t just put out fires and juggle last minute tasks. Sounds pretty great, right?

4 Fast, Easy Ways to Boost Marketing Productivity

1. Provide the Right Structure 

According to Mike, there are two schools of thought when it comes to structure and process. You either think:

  1. Process kills creativity and innovation.
  2. A lack of process kills creativity and innovation.

Which school of thought do you fall into?

Do you think processes complicate work, create too many steps, and are irrelevant to the task at-hand? Or, do you think a lack of process leads to juggling whatever is thrown your way and leaves you wondering what the next step is?

If you picked one over the other, you’re in the wrong camp. Mike explained: “You need to have a balance between the two. Too much process and too little process are both problematic. Just enough process unlocks creativity and innovation.”

[bctt tweet=”Too much process and too little process are both problematic. Just enough process unlocks creativity and innovation. @Michael_Riding #DSMPLS” username=”toprank”]

To see how many processes your own organization leverages, Mike suggests carefully examining your workflow, understanding it, and slowly improving it over time. This step should also include documentation. “You’ll only get to this point if you have the discipline to sit down and write your processes out,” he said.

With documented processes, you can easily template them and make small, iterative changes that significantly improve how you work.

2. Make Collaboration Easier

“Why do we have meetings?” was a question Mike posed half-way through his presentation.

“To crush our souls!” one enthusiastic attendee shouted back. 

In reality, meetings exist for five reasons:

  1. Give information
  2. Get information 
  3. Develop ideas
  4. Make decisions
  5. Create warm, magical human contact

Marketing isn’t a one-person job. Even if you’re the sole marketer in your organization, you still need to work closely with sales, service, and other teams across the organization to do quality work, on time. These relationships within your own department, and with others, need to have easy collaboration between them. And meetings are a great way of bringing those parties together for sharing, brainstorming, alignment, and more. 

But 62% of workers say meetings are the No. 1 thing that gets in the way of work. We aren’t making use of our time together. 

To make meetings count, Mike suggests making objectives and agendas clear and upfront in the meeting invite itself. He also asks marketers to be better about not meeting. Shave your meeting times from 60 minutes to 30 minutes. Decline invited for meetings that don’t have an agenda. Stack your meetings back-to-back so there aren’t odd, unproductive gaps between them. And, lastly, block out time for real work:

“I love teams that say, ‘Every Thursday we’re going to be at home,’” he shared. “It’s hands-off time so they can get important work done and not be disturbed.”

3. Streamline Review and Approvals

If there was one point in Mike’s talk that had me shouting “Hallelujah!”, it was when he proclaimed: “Trim the approval chain!”

As Mike pointed out from Workfront’s State of Work Report:

  • 60% of marketers go through 5 or more rounds of review
  • 14% of marketers endure 10 or more rounds

That’s an insane number of revisions and a massive time suck. There’s a reason why he chose the word “endure”: over 10 rounds of edits is torture.

“What this tells me is that ‘We don’t have the structure to give the stamp of approval.’” he said. “It’s a Merry-Go-Round effect.”

How do you get off the Merry-Go-Round ride? 

“Proof in one place and document the process. It creates an audit chain where you can see where the product has been and how it got into the state it’s in now,” Mike suggested. 

With a clear audit chain and proof history, you can see where common bottlenecks are and where optimizations can be made. 

4. Measure What Matters

Just like measurement is important for your campaigns, it’s equally as important for your work. But how do you measure something as broad and all-encompassing as work? 

Luckily, Mike shared five Work Performance Indicators (WPIs) that will help you get started: 

  1. Mix
  2. Capacity
  3. Velocity
  4. Quality
  5. Engagement

Mix is the type of work that you’re doing. Are you doing maintenance work that keeps the engine running? Or, are you doing growth work that creates new opportunities? Know your current mix and your ideal mix so you can make room for the type of work you want to focus on.

Capacity is the amount of work your team can perform. Are you operating over capacity or under? Knowing this measurement will help you determine if you can take on more work and when.

Velocity is the speed at which you can complete the work. This measurement is extremely helpful for anticipating the time needed to complete projects. 

Quality is how you (and others) feel about the work that is being completed. Are your clients happy with the finished product? Is the team proud of what they’ve accomplished?

Engagement is a measurement of how engaged your employees are with the work. People do their best work then they understand their role, believe their role matters, and are proud of what they do. To make sure your team wants to get the work done, you need to measure their level of engagement in the work that they do.

With these five WPIs tracked, you’ll get better insight into what you can do and how you can do it better.

Workin’ 9 to 5

Preach, Dolly. And with Mike’s tips from the floors of Digital Summit Minneapolis, maybe we’re not so far off from that 9 to 5 dream. It just takes the right amount of process, easier collaboration, streamlined approvals, and measurement to get there. 

For more marketing tricks and tips, stay tuned here for updates from Digital Summit Minneapolis (#DSMPLS). For real-time insights, follow @annieleuman, @azeckman, @dfriez, and @ElizabethW1057 on Twitter.

The post 4 Marketing Productivity Tips from Workfront’s Mike Riding #DSMPLS appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.


Source: SEO blog

Joseph Lindberg of Land O’Lakes Outlines How to Build a Marketing Dashboarding Discipline #DSMPLS

Marketing measurement. It’s absolutely essential, but perhaps one of the hardest marketing disciplines to master. Why? As Joseph Lindberg, Digital Communications Editor for Land O’Lakes, Inc., told a room of marketers at Digital Summit Minneapolis this week:

“Measurement is a loaded term. It means many things to many people.”

It’s true. Measurement can be thought of in terms of KPIs. Measurement can be raw data or data insights. Measurement can be your stack of tools.

And during his session, titled Building a Marketing Dashboarding Discipline: It’s Not About the Tool (Until It Is), Joseph challenged marketers to flip our thinking on how we measure.

Below we outline his recommended process and advice for how you can level up your measurement game, and map tactics to business objectives so you can prove value up the ladder.

See Your Challenges as Opportunities

Joseph opened up his presentation with a recent challenge his team was handed earlier this year: South by Southwest (SXSW). The first year they attended, marketing expectations were tempered—the novelty of an agriculture company attending was enough. But year two was a different story. They had a complicated, nuanced message to share with a skeptical audience—and less than 15 business days from when they received their KPIs from management to when the activation needed to be executed.

Joseph suggested using a challenge like this as a tool. 

“You don’t have to change the entire system. But if you can start a little internal disruption, start thinking about KPIs differently, you’ll get a whole lot further,” he shared.

[bctt tweet=”You don’t have to change the entire system. But if you can start a little internal disruption, start thinking about KPIs differently, you’ll get a whole lot further. @JosephLindberg #DSMPLS” username=”toprank”]

Have Difficult Conversations

Like many marketers, the KPI list from management spanned several pages, with every little metric from pageviews to CTR. What do you do with that? Try to take on them all?

Joseph said “No.”

Joseph’s team used the urgency and importance of SXSW to drive deep conversations around the goals at the campaign onset. He explained, “We started with the biggest, messiest questions. We got to have conversations that I don’t think the organization had ever had before.”

But he said don’t get way into the clouds of business objectives driving tactics. The goals need to help you achieve the business objectives. And, your tactics should be selected after you have goals.

The output of these challenging conversations were the true measurement needs: Make vanity metrics accessible to leadership and access the right data needed to optimize content and spending in real-time. Now, they could make the right dashboard a reality.

Appreciate your Foundation and Replicate

“We discovered the dashboard was one of the most valuable outputs of SXSW,” Joseph asserted.

The challenge, subsequent difficult conversations, and dashboard output was now a brilliant foundation for future program measurement.

Sure, each marketing program will require its own set of goals, KPIs, and metrics resulting in a slightly different dashboard. But the infrastructure was now in place. The team was now comfortable having difficult conversationseven on a time crunch. And, knew how to translate their goals into KPIs and iterate on existing dashboards.

Making Your Measurement Vision a Reality

His advice for marketers for marketers to help turn their measurement vision into a reality?

1. Move the dashboard conversation around. Start with your goals. Use them to inform your data needs. Then, put tools in place to collect the data you need to measure success.

Flipping the Digital Marketing Measurement Approach

2. Develop a holistic measurement process. Make sure it works for your team so you can set your own foundation. This is something our own Tiffani Allen, Associate Director of Search and Analytics, recently covered in a post on creating an actionable marketing dashboard.

3. Leverage the right allies. When iterating on your dashboards, it can be easy to get discouraged. But the trick is to surround yourself with people who are incredibly enthusiastic. They will help drive the appetite to make things better.

For the latest and greatest digital marketing knowledge, keep your eyes peeled here for updates from Digital Summit Minneapolis (#DSMPLS). For real-time insights, follow @annieleuman, @azeckman, @dfriez, and @ElizabethW1057 on Twitter.

The post Joseph Lindberg of Land O’Lakes Outlines How to Build a Marketing Dashboarding Discipline #DSMPLS appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.


Source: SEO blog

The Future of Marketing As Seen By Randi Zuckerberg #DSMPLS

Randi Zuckerberg Speaks at DSMPLS

Randi Zuckerberg Speaks at DSMPLS

“Technology is changing the way we do business.” 

Said everyone, ever. 

Marketers know technology is changing how we interact with our audience. But knowing it’s happening and doing something about it are two very different things. 

Randi Zuckerberg is no stranger to technology and its effects on business, daily life, and social structures. As the founder and CEO of her own media company, Zuckerberg Media, and a former marketing leader at Facebook, Randi has a unique vision for the future of marketing and how today’s marketers can adapt. 

Explore that future with her insights below from the floor of Digital Summit Minneapolis

We’re Afraid to Fail

We’ve been talking about the evolving state of marketing for years. But maybe we as marketers haven’t changed all that much. Why?

Well, as Randi pointed out in her keynote, we’re afraid to fail. It’s only human to be fearful of putting your whacky, ground-breaking, oddball ideas out there for everyone to see—and critique. 

To overcome this fear and encourage unbridled creativity, Facebook sponsored a “hackathon” event where every employee was empowered to stay up all night and come up with crazy inventions and ideas. One of Randi’s out-of-the-box ideas was that at some point in the future, each person was going to have their own television network. So, she started a show and streamed it in real-time. It’s that idea and premise that became Facebook Live, which recently rolled out to 2 billion users. 

“I believe every person in here is sitting on that 2-billion-person idea. You just have to get over your fear of failure,” Randi told the audience.

The trick will be to give yourself and your employees the freedom to come up with and present them. Don’t kill projects and ideas that are different from yours, push them to the next step.

Everything Is Media

There’s been a dramatic shift in how audiences consume content. An example Randi used was Red Bull and Felix Baumgartner’s stratosphere jump. That jump was streamed on Facebook and broke records. 

“It begged the question: are they an energy drink? Or an extreme sports network?” 

Randi also shared that Coca-Cola has 100 million fans and followers across social media, which is more than every broadcast television network combined. 

This could have wild implications. As Randi put it: “Will there be a day when brands go to Coca-Cola to advertise their products?”

For brands to be successful in the future of marketing, they need to think like a media company. Treat your marketing like television programming. How are you going to entertain your audience today? How are you going to teach them important lessons? What makes your channel unique? 

A Collection of Personal Brands

TLC. Lifetime. Bravo. CNN. These channels have a brand. A personality. A niche in the marketplace. But so does their cast of talent, news anchors, and late-night hosts.

Every person, every employee in your company is an expert—including yourself. So, why not create your own personal brand? And encourage others at your company to do the same. 

“The advice I give to entrepreneurs hoping to start a brand is to be nice to yourself. Be authentic. And remember that this is hard.”

[bctt tweet=”The advice I give to entrepreneurs hoping to start a brand is to be nice to yourself. Be authentic. And remember that this is hard. @randizuckerberg” username=”toprank”]

With a collection of personal brands behind your company, you’re expanding the audiences you can reach. You’re also going to see better engagement. Would you rather talk to a person or a company?  And finally, strong, personal branding helps you get noticed and stand out in the crowd.

It’s Showtime

Randi Zuckerberg had a lot of great advice to share (and one killer song).

Randi Zuckerberg Presenting at Digital Summit Minneapolis

But the lesson that stood out to me the most was that the future of marketing is really the future of media. They’re intertwined and becoming increasingly more connected as technology changes how we interact with the world. We might be marketers, but we’re also producers. Network executives. Actors. Showrunners. So, let’s give our audience a great show. 

For the latest and greatest digital marketing knowledge, keep your eyes peeled here for updates from Digital Summit Minneapolis (#DSMPLS). For real-time insights, follow @annieleuman, @azeckman, @dfriez, and @ElizabethW1057 on Twitter.

The post The Future of Marketing As Seen By Randi Zuckerberg #DSMPLS appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.


Source: SEO blog

The Future of Marketing As Seen By Randi Zuckerberg #DSMPLS

Randi Zuckerberg Speaks at DSMPLS

“Technology is changing the way we do business.” 

Said everyone, ever. 

Marketers know technology is changing how we interact with our audience. But knowing it’s happening and doing something about it are two very different things. 

Randi Zuckerberg is no stranger to technology and its effects on business, daily life, and social structures. As the founder and CEO of her own media company, Zuckerberg Media, and a former marketing leader at Facebook, Randi has a unique vision for the future of marketing and how today’s marketers can adapt. 

Explore that future with her insights below from the floor of Digital Summit Minneapolis

We’re Afraid to Fail

We’ve been talking about the evolving state of marketing for years. But maybe we as marketers haven’t changed all that much. Why?

Well, as Randi pointed out in her keynote, we’re afraid to fail. It’s only human to be fearful of putting your whacky, ground-breaking, oddball ideas out there for everyone to see—and critique. 

To overcome this fear and encourage unbridled creativity, Facebook sponsored a “hackathon” event where every employee was empowered to stay up all night and come up with crazy inventions and ideas. One of Randi’s out-of-the-box ideas was that at some point in the future, each person was going to have their own television network. So, she started a show and streamed it in real-time. It’s that idea and premise that became Facebook Live, which recently rolled out to 2 billion users. 

“I believe every person in here is sitting on that 2-billion-person idea. You just have to get over your fear of failure,” Randi told the audience.

The trick will be to give yourself and your employees the freedom to come up with and present them. Don’t kill projects and ideas that are different from yours, push them to the next step.

Everything Is Media

There’s been a dramatic shift in how audiences consume content. An example Randi used was Red Bull and Felix Baumgartner’s stratosphere jump. That jump was streamed on Facebook and broke records. 

“It begged the question: are they an energy drink? Or an extreme sports network?” 

Randi also shared that Coca-Cola has 100 million fans and followers across social media, which is more than every broadcast television network combined. 

This could have wild implications. As Randi put it: “Will there be a day when brands go to Coca-Cola to advertise their products?”

For brands to be successful in the future of marketing, they need to think like a media company. Treat your marketing like television programming. How are you going to entertain your audience today? How are you going to teach them important lessons? What makes your channel unique? 

A Collection of Personal Brands

TLC. Lifetime. Bravo. CNN. These channels have a brand. A personality. A niche in the marketplace. But so does their cast of talent, news anchors, and late-night hosts.

Every person, every employee in your company is an expert—including yourself. So, why not create your own personal brand? And encourage others at your company to do the same. 

“The advice I give to entrepreneurs hoping to start a brand is to be nice to yourself. Be authentic. And remember that this is hard.”

The advice I give to entrepreneurs hoping to start a brand is to be nice to yourself. Be authentic. And remember that this is hard. @randizuckerberg Click To Tweet

With a collection of personal brands behind your company, you’re expanding the audiences you can reach. You’re also going to see better engagement. Would you rather talk to a person or a company?  And finally, strong, personal branding helps you get noticed and stand out in the crowd.

It’s Showtime

Randi Zuckerberg had a lot of great advice to share (and one killer song).

Randi Zuckerberg Presenting at Digital Summit Minneapolis

But the lesson that stood out to me the most was that the future of marketing is really the future of media. They’re intertwined and becoming increasingly more connected as technology changes how we interact with the world. We might be marketers, but we’re also producers. Network executives. Actors. Showrunners. So, let’s give our audience a great show. 

For the latest and greatest digital marketing knowledge, keep your eyes peeled here for updates from Digital Summit Minneapolis (#DSMPLS). For real-time insights, follow @annieleuman, @azeckman, @dfriez, and @ElizabethW1057 on Twitter.