2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing Report from TopRank Marketing

B2B Influencer Marketing Report 2020

B2B Influencer Marketing Report 2020

My team and I at TopRank Marketing are happy to announce the 2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing Report!

Influencer Marketing has fast accelerated as a topic over the past few years with B2C influencers and brands getting the majority of attention. While consumer focused influencers have been impacted during the COVID-19 pandemic, B2B is a different story.

Whether in times of crisis or in competitive markets, B2B marketers are challenged to reach distracted buyers and create meaningful experiences that inspire trust, confidence and action.

As B2B marketers search for solid insight and leadership around marketing strategies to survive and thrive during this time of uncertainty, Influencer Marketing offers businesses a welcome dose of optimism.

With much of the research and media attention focused on B2C influencer marketing, we believe the 2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing Report to be the first ever research report dedicated to B2B.

B2B Marketers are hungry for effective marketing strategies but don’t always have the resources or confidence to implement. To help close the gap of knowledge and skills around working with influencers to impact marketing and business goals, this new report focuses exclusively on how businesses are engaging influencers for marketing to other businesses.

For this research, hundreds of B2B marketers shared their insights including many of the top B2B brands in the world on all things B2B influencer marketing including strategy, tactics, operations, software, integration, measurement, budgeting and the future.

We’ve combined the findings from our research with insights from top B2B marketers from brands, case studies and some of the most respected B2B influencers in the industry to give you direction, confidence and inspiration for the best that influencer marketing has to offer.

Some of the key findings from the 2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing Report:

B2B influencer marketing statistics

B2B Influencer Marketing is Valuable for B2B Brands:

  • 78% believe their prospects rely on advice from industry influencers
  • 74% agree that influencer marketing improves customer and prospect experience with the brand
  • 63% agree that marketing would have better results if it included a B2B influencer marketing program
  • 90% expect their budget to increase or stay the same

Top Challenges B2B Marketers Have with Influencer Marketing:

  • Only 35% use software to find influencers – most ask for recommendations from personal connections or other influencers (no data validation)
  • Only half include a plan for influencer activation in their strategy
  • 41% are not using any technology for their IM program
  • Only 19% of B2B marketers are running ongoing influencer marketing programs
  • 60% say they don’t have the knowledge to execute or have the right skills in house to implement ongoing IM programs

Characteristics of the Most Successful B2B Brands at Influencer Marketing:

  • Always On: 60% of marketers who use always on IM programs are very successful vs. 5% who do periodic campaigns
  • Use industry experts and analysts
  • Use blogs as platforms
  • Use software to identify and qualify influencers
  • Create interactive content with influencers
  • Have a centralized IM program
  • Integrate with corporate communications department
  • Have a documented strategy for B2B IM

B2B Influencer Marketing Report Preview
This 45+ page report is rich with insights
from the survey of hundreds of B2B marketers, featured case studies from B2B brands of all sizes and insights from 15 of the top B2B marketing experts and influencers about Influencer Marketing. We also included a list of 20 top Influencer Marketing practitioners from B2B brands. To give you an idea of what’s inside, here’s the report Table of Contents:

The Influence Advantage: From thought leadership to customer acquisition, B2B brands are optimistic about the competitive advantages of influencer marketing. Find out why.

The Engine of Influence is Always-On: B2B brands are evolving from short term influencer campaigns to relationship driven, Always-On programs that build trust, engagement and advocacy..

Influencer Marketing Integration: To create a better customer experience, B2B brands are integrating influencer content across marketing channels from content marketing to PR.

Influencer Marketing Operations: To scale influencer marketing while maintaining quality, processes and software are essential for influencer identification, communications and performance reporting. .

10 Predictions on the Future of B2B Influence: What will B2B influencer marketing look like in 2021 and beyond? Get answers from 10 top influencer marketing professionals.

And here are a few insights from some of the respected B2B Marketers and Business Influencers who contributed:

Rani Mani Adobe
“Engaging with influencers provides a myriad of competitive advantages. There’s nothing more comforting than to have trusted voices defend your brand or correct misperceptions.”
Rani Mani @ranimani0707
Head of Social Influencer Enablement at @Adobe

Ursula Ringham SAP
“The operations behind Influencer Marketing is the less glamorous yet essential side of relational business. You need to come up with a strategy, plan of action, and a process.” Ursula Ringham @ursularingham
Head of Global Influencer Marketing at SAP

Garnor Morantes
“Being ‘always-on’ has allowed our team to build meaningful relationships with influencers. B2B brands would be wise to adopt this approach as they look to build true brand advocates.”
Garnor Morantes /in/garnormorantes
Group Marketing Manager at LinkedIn

Sarita Rao AT&T Business
“Customers know authenticity when they see it & naturally trust humans more than brands. Working with credible B2B influencers helps to build brand authority through real, human conversations & interactions.”
Sarita Rao @saritasayso
SVP – Business Marketing, Analytics & Alliances at AT&T Business

Tom Treanor arm Treasure Data
“Ongoing influencer programs are more valuable to B2B companies and allow for deeper engagement with influencers. These connected activities provide a cohesive experience for your audience.”
Tom Treanor @RtMixMktg
VP, Global Head of Marketing at arm Treasure Data

Amisha Gandhi
“Working with the right influencers builds credibility with the audience you are trying to reach. Influencers can help you deliver content that solves problems, educates & inspires your intended audience.”
Amisha Gandhi @AmishaGandhi
VP, Influencer Marketing & Communications at SAP Ariba

Janine Wegner Dell
“Having an end-to-end process is key to be effective & scale. From clear objectives to identification, engagement tactics, management, budgeting, reporting & not to forget feedback to close the loop.”
Janine Wegner @JanineWegner
Global Thought Leadership Program & Activation Manager at Dell Technologies

Ryan Bares IBM Systems
“A shift I see for B2B influencer marketing in 2021 is using employees as influencers. This will allow marketers to have more control of the campaign & build advocacy among internal thought leaders.”
Ryan Barres @RyanBares
Global Social Programs Lead: Social Influencers & Employee Advocacy at IBM Systems

 Pierre-Loic Assayag Traackr
“As influencer marketing matures, brands will expect their influencer marketing software to integrate with the rest of the march stack.”
Pierre-Loic Assayag @pierreloic
Founder and CEO at Traackr

Ann Handley MarketingProfs
“Partnering with well-matched influencers is a handy way to infuse your brand with creative energy and inspiration. It’s a direct line to building trust and customer confidence.” Ann Handley @MarketingProfs
Chief Content Officer at MarketingProfs

Jeff Davis
“We will see the rise of the customers as influencers given their ability to share stories that help target buyers navigate the increasingly complex B2B buying journey. ”
Jeff Davis @meetjeffdavis
Founder & Principal at JD2 Consulting

Tamara McCleary
“In 2021, brands will need to identify, test and deploy a new type of tech stack to make the creation and consumption of virtual content as seamless as possible for influencers and audiences alike.”
Tamara McCleary @TamaraMcCleary
CEO at Thulium

Kevin L. Jackson
“In 2021, success in B2B influencer marketing is dependent on the compelling delivery of relevant information via video & audio. Influencers can no longer rely on face-to-face personal charisma.”
Kevin Jackson @Kevin_Jackson
CEO at GC Globalnet

Mark Schaefer
“Traditional marketing channels are drying up and even trade shows are imperiled in 2021. The influence marketing trend will be amplified as businesses seek trusted voices to join industry conversations.”
Mark Schaefer @markwschaefer
Author, Return on Influence
COO at B Squared Media

And many more…

B2B Influencer Marketing Report 2020
Influence plays an essential role in marketing whether B2B brands run influencer programs or not. The question is, will influence be random or will it be nurtured, amplified and targeted to produce brand awareness and lead generation outcomes B2B marketers are after?

The research supports optimism for B2B Influencer Marketing for a few key reasons:

  • Brand trust is in question but buyers trust experts
  • Influence optimizes performance of content and other marketing
  • Influence differentiates B2B brand experiences

The B2B marketing world is at the cusp of change but also opportunity. The influence advantage is available for marketers who can adopt the best practices of the most successful B2B influencer marketers outlined in this report from an Always-On strategy to qualitative influencer engagement to effective operations with process and software.

I encourage you to access the 2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing Report and to get the insights that have been missing in B2B about working with influencers.

A BIG THANKS goes to Michele from Mantis Research for all her help with research design and analytics. HUGE APPRECIATION to Ashley from TopRank Marketing for project and content management as well as a MASSIVE PROPS to Jake from TopRank Marketing for a stellar design! Thank you to our other team members from Lane to Alexis for pitching in as well.

The post 2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing Report from TopRank Marketing appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.


Source: SEO blog

2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing Report from TopRank Marketing

B2B Influencer Marketing Report 2020

My team and I at TopRank Marketing are happy to announce the 2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing Report!

Influencer Marketing has fast accelerated as a topic over the past few years with B2C influencers and brands getting the majority of attention. While consumer focused influencers have been impacted during the COVID-19 pandemic, B2B is a different story.

Whether in times of crisis or in competitive markets, B2B marketers are challenged to reach distracted buyers and create meaningful experiences that inspire trust, confidence and action.

As B2B marketers search for solid insight and leadership around marketing strategies to survive and thrive during this time of uncertainty, Influencer Marketing offers businesses a welcome dose of optimism.

With much of the research and media attention focused on B2C influencer marketing, we believe the 2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing Report to be the first ever research report dedicated to B2B.

B2B Marketers are hungry for effective marketing strategies but don’t always have the resources or confidence to implement. To help close the gap of knowledge and skills around working with influencers to impact marketing and business goals, this new report focuses exclusively on how businesses are engaging influencers for marketing to other businesses.

For this research, hundreds of B2B marketers shared their insights including many of the top B2B brands in the world on all things B2B influencer marketing including strategy, tactics, operations, software, integration, measurement, budgeting and the future.

We’ve combined the findings from our research with insights from top B2B marketers from brands, case studies and some of the most respected B2B influencers in the industry to give you direction, confidence and inspiration for the best that influencer marketing has to offer.

Some of the key findings from the 2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing Report:

B2B Influencer Marketing is Valuable for B2B Brands:

  • 78% believe their prospects rely on advice from industry influencers
  • 74% agree that influencer marketing improves customer and prospect experience with the brand
  • 63% agree that marketing would have better results if it included a B2B influencer marketing program
  • 90% expect their budget to increase or stay the same

Top Challenges B2B Marketers Have with Influencer Marketing:

  • Only 35% use software to find influencers – most ask for recommendations from personal connections or other influencers (no data validation)
  • Only half include a plan for influencer activation in their strategy
  • 41% are not using any technology for their IM program
  • Only 19% of B2B marketers are running ongoing influencer marketing programs
  • 60% say they don’t have the knowledge to execute or have the right skills in house to implement ongoing IM programs

Characteristics of the Most Successful B2B Brands at Influencer Marketing:

  • Always On: 60% of marketers who use always on IM programs are very successful vs. 5% who do periodic campaigns
  • Use industry experts and analysts
  • Use blogs as platforms
  • Use software to identify and qualify influencers
  • Create interactive content with influencers
  • Have a centralized IM program
  • Integrate with corporate communications department
  • Have a documented strategy for B2B IM

B2B Influencer Marketing Report Preview
This 45+ page report is rich with insights
from the survey of hundreds of B2B marketers, featured case studies from B2B brands of all sizes and insights from 15 of the top B2B marketing experts and influencers about Influencer Marketing. We also included a list of 20 top Influencer Marketing practitioners from B2B brands. To give you an idea of what’s inside, here’s the report Table of Contents:

The Influence Advantage: From thought leadership to customer acquisition, B2B brands are optimistic about the competitive advantages of influencer marketing. Find out why.

The Engine of Influence is Always-On: B2B brands are evolving from short term influencer campaigns to relationship driven, Always-On programs that build trust, engagement and advocacy..

Influencer Marketing Integration: To create a better customer experience, B2B brands are integrating influencer content across marketing channels from content marketing to PR.

Influencer Marketing Operations: To scale influencer marketing while maintaining quality, processes and software are essential for influencer identification, communications and performance reporting. .

10 Predictions on the Future of B2B Influence: What will B2B influencer marketing look like in 2021 and beyond? Get answers from 10 top influencer marketing professionals.

And here are a few insights from some of the respected B2B Marketers and Business Influencers who contributed:

Rani Mani Adobe
“Engaging with influencers provides a myriad of competitive advantages. There’s nothing more comforting than to have trusted voices defend your brand or correct misperceptions.”
Rani Mani @ranimani0707
Head of Social Influencer Enablement at @Adobe

Ursula Ringham SAP
“The operations behind Influencer Marketing is the less glamorous yet essential side of relational business. You need to come up with a strategy, plan of action, and a process.” Ursula Ringham @ursularingham
Head of Global Influencer Marketing at SAP

Garnor Morantes
“Being ‘always-on’ has allowed our team to build meaningful relationships with influencers. B2B brands would be wise to adopt this approach as they look to build true brand advocates.”
Garnor Morantes /in/garnormorantes
Group Marketing Manager at LinkedIn

Sarita Rao AT&T Business
“Customers know authenticity when they see it & naturally trust humans more than brands. Working with credible B2B influencers helps to build brand authority through real, human conversations & interactions.”
Sarita Rao @saritasayso
SVP – Business Marketing, Analytics & Alliances at AT&T Business

Tom Treanor arm Treasure Data
“Ongoing influencer programs are more valuable to B2B companies and allow for deeper engagement with influencers. These connected activities provide a cohesive experience for your audience.”
Tom Treanor @RtMixMktg
VP, Global Head of Marketing at arm Treasure Data

Amisha Gandhi
“Working with the right influencers builds credibility with the audience you are trying to reach. Influencers can help you deliver content that solves problems, educates & inspires your intended audience.”
Amisha Gandhi @AmishaGandhi
VP, Influencer Marketing & Communications at SAP Ariba

Janine Wegner Dell
“Having an end-to-end process is key to be effective & scale. From clear objectives to identification, engagement tactics, management, budgeting, reporting & not to forget feedback to close the loop.”
Janine Wegner @JanineWegner
Global Thought Leadership Program & Activation Manager at Dell Technologies

Ryan Bares IBM Systems
“A shift I see for B2B influencer marketing in 2021 is using employees as influencers. This will allow marketers to have more control of the campaign & build advocacy among internal thought leaders.”
Ryan Barres @RyanBares
Global Social Programs Lead: Social Influencers & Employee Advocacy at IBM Systems

 Pierre-Loic Assayag Traackr
“As influencer marketing matures, brands will expect their influencer marketing software to integrate with the rest of the march stack.”
Pierre-Loic Assayag @pierreloic
Founder and CEO at Traackr

Ann Handley MarketingProfs
“Partnering with well-matched influencers is a handy way to infuse your brand with creative energy and inspiration. It’s a direct line to building trust and customer confidence.” Ann Handley @MarketingProfs
Chief Content Officer at MarketingProfs

Jeff Davis
“We will see the rise of the customers as influencers given their ability to share stories that help target buyers navigate the increasingly complex B2B buying journey. ”
Jeff Davis @meetjeffdavis
Founder & Principal at JD2 Consulting

Tamara McCleary
“In 2021, brands will need to identify, test and deploy a new type of tech stack to make the creation and consumption of virtual content as seamless as possible for influencers and audiences alike.”
Tamara McCleary @TamaraMcCleary
CEO at Thulium

Kevin L. Jackson
“In 2021, success in B2B influencer marketing is dependent on the compelling delivery of relevant information via video & audio. Influencers can no longer rely on face-to-face personal charisma.”
Kevin Jackson @Kevin_Jackson
CEO at GC Globalnet

Mark Schaefer
“Traditional marketing channels are drying up and even trade shows are imperiled in 2021. The influence marketing trend will be amplified as businesses seek trusted voices to join industry conversations.”
Mark Schaefer @markwschaefer
Author, Return on Influence
COO at B Squared Media

And many more…

B2B Influencer Marketing Report 2020
Influence plays an essential role in marketing whether B2B brands run influencer programs or not. The question is, will influence be random or will it be nurtured, amplified and targeted to produce brand awareness and lead generation outcomes B2B marketers are after?

The research supports optimism for B2B Influencer Marketing for a few key reasons:

  • Brand trust is in question but buyers trust experts
  • Influence optimizes performance of content and other marketing
  • Influence differentiates B2B brand experiences

The B2B marketing world is at the cusp of change but also opportunity. The influence advantage is available for marketers who can adopt the best practices of the most successful B2B influencer marketers outlined in this report from an Always-On strategy to qualitative influencer engagement to effective operations with process and software.

I encourage you to access the 2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing Report and to get the insights that have been missing in B2B about working with influencers.

A BIG THANKS goes to Michele from Mantis Research for all her help with research design and analytics. HUGE APPRECIATION to Ashley from TopRank Marketing for project and content management as well as a MASSIVE PROPS to Jake from TopRank Marketing for a stellar design! Thank you to our other team members from Lane to Alexis for pitching in as well.

The Real Short-Term and Long-Term Results of Content Marketing and Digital PR

One of the best ways (and in my opinion, the best way) to earn top-quality links is to create your own studies, surveys, reports, etc., and pitch them to online publishers. This is what we do at Fractl, because it’s a tried-and-true way to elevate organic growth:

Over the years, we’ve received a lot of questions about what results to expect. Sure, everyone wants links now, but where does the real growth come in, and how long does it take? And in either case, people want to know what wins they can report on to their superiors, even in the short-term.

There are so many benefits to this combination of content marketing and digital PR, and I’ll walk through what you can realistically expect, and feature examples and data from our experience working with Porch.com.

Short-term benefits

It’s true that content marketing is an investment, which I’ll explain properly in the next section. But there are certainly short-term wins you can celebrate and report on, and that can have an impact on your business.

We started working with Porch.com in early 2018. We created 4-5 content projects per month for them back then, and I’m going to show you two of our early wins — a small win and a big win — so you can get a sense of what’s possible as well as what’s probable.

The small win: “Fixer Upper” by the numbers

This project was my idea, so naturally I think it deserved way more coverage. It was during the heyday of “Fixer Upper” featuring Chip and Joanna Gaines.

We secured top-tier coverage for it on Apartment Therapy, and while I would’ve liked to have seen more media coverage, there are still plenty of wins to identify here (and elements for you to keep an eye out for in your own content):

  • Brand mentions: Porch is mentioned four times in the article (six if you count image credits). Every time your brand is mentioned, you’re upping your brand awareness.
  • Link quality: The article linked to our project three separate times! (Bonus: More links means higher likelihood of referral traffic.) The site has a domain authority of 90, making it a very high-value earned link.
  • Audience relevance: Porch is about connecting people to home renovation contractors. Their audience probably has a ton of overlap with the Apartment Therapy audience, and are presumably interested in improving the look of their homes.
  • Publication readership: Then there’s the matter of the publication’s statistics, which can help you get a sense of potential reach. SimilarWeb is used by tools like Cision and Meltwater to highlight publications’ readership. In this case, Apartment Therapy is ranked #17 in the “Home Garden” category of sites, and has an estimated 9.16 million visitors per month.

So, even in one average-performing project, you can get some great links and brand exposure.

The big win: “Cooking Nightmares”

Okay, “big” win is kind of an understatement. This campaign was a huge win and remained one of our top-performing projects for Porch.

We surveyed people of all ages to determine their cooking skills and confidence, and then broke the results down by generation. People found the results fascinating, and all-in-all, the project garnered about 50 dofollow links.

In measuring this project’s success, you can look at the same qualities I mentioned for smaller wins: brand mentions, link quality, and audience relevance.

But here are some other considerations for bigger wins:

  • Amount of coverage: The project went wild, earning media coverage on Washington Post, USA Today, Bustle, Thrillist, MSN, Real Simple, Southern Living, Better Homes & Gardens, and more. This coverage meant more high-quality links and significantly more brand exposure, including to a more general audience.
  • Nature of brand mention: Exactly where and how is your brand mentioned? For example, in the Washington Post coverage and Thrillist coverage, they mentioned Porch.com in the second sentence. Bustle included a description of what Porch.com is: “an online resource for connecting homeowners and contractors,” which not only gets the Porch name out there, but also explains what they do.
  • Writer connections: The more writers who are happy with what you’re pitching, the higher the chance they’ll open your next email. All secured media coverage is a win in this way, but it’s a significant element that’s often overlooked.

There are plenty of short-term wins to this kind of work, but odds are you’re looking for sustained growth. That’s where the long-term benefits come in.

Long-term benefits

On our site, we have a full content marketing case study that details the impact of the work we did for Porch.com in the span of a year.

That includes building links from 931 unique linking domains and adding 23,000 monthly organic visitors to the site.

This is the kind of long-term growth most people are looking for, and the key is that all of this work compounds.

Building authoritative links is critical to off-site SEO, as Google views your site as more of an authority, which subsequently means your on-site content is more likely to rank higher. And when people see your brand mentioned in the media because you’ve completed these interesting studies, they’re more likely to click on your content when they see it later because they’re familiar with you, again signaling that you have quality content.

This is our philosophy on things:

And this doesn’t even include the brand awareness aspect that I mentioned before. Which is why, to really assess the long-term impact of a content marketing and digital PR investment, you can look at the following:

  • Backlink portfolio health: High-quality, relevant links will always be valued, even if they’re older. But newer links can signal to Google that you remain relevant and continue to actively provide value to audiences.
  • Organic brand mentions: When your brand name is consistently in the media, it increases the chances people know who you are. Are your branded searches increasing? What are people searching for related to your brand? Are you appearing more often organically in content?
  • Organic traffic: This is the primary metric many look at, because as I mentioned, earning brand coverage and links from top publishers means you’re building your authority, which improves your chances of ranking in Google and for being trusted by audiences, all of which impact your organic search numbers.

We ended up working with Porch.com for longer than a year, from about January 2018 to March 2020. In total, we earned them 1,894 dofollow links and the brand mentions and awareness that accompanied all of that media coverage.

But I want to show you what it looks like to get to this place of growth, and how it’s not by going viral on a monthly basis. It’s about sustained, ongoing work.

This is what it looked like for our work with Porch:

As you can see, we had some projects that earned a very high number of dofollow links. This often occurs when you’re producing a high volume of content over the course of many months.

However, the bulk of your content will fall in the average. Most of our work earned somewhere between 1 and 50 dofollow links, with top performers in the 50 to 100 range.

To see this spread, you have to keep doing the work. You won’t get all of those projects that earn 50-100 dofollow links right off the bat and in a row, and even if you did, while you’d get a big boost, it wouldn’t last you forever. You have to demonstrate your ongoing effort to provide value.

Conclusion

It’s true that content marketing is a long game, at least in order to see significant growth for your company. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t wins in the short-term. You can absolutely see a lift from a high-performing project and at the very least start setting up a stronger foundation for brand awareness and backlink building.

B2B Marketing News: Podcast Downloads Climb, Social & Display Ad Spend Rising, Snapchat’s Brand Profiles, & Google’s Latest Ad Tools

2020 July 24 MotionCue Chart

2020 July 24 MotionCue Chart

‘The downloads are back’: Podcasting finishes the first half of 2020 strong
Podcast downloads have come back to pre-pandemic numbers, increasing from 625 million in March to 825 million over the past two months, while podcast advertising is still expected to increase by 15 percent for the year, according to recently-released report data. DigiDay

LinkedIn Revenue Up 10%, Sessions Up 27%, in Latest Performance Update
Double-digit quarterly revenue growth of 10 percent over the previous quarter has been reported from LinkedIn (client), accompanied by user platform session growth of 27 percent, the Microsoft-owned firm recently announced. Social Media Today

Programmatic Advertising Trends: Top Tactics, Challenges, and Metrics
61 percent of marketers view return on investment (ROI) as their top programmatic advertising metric, while 46 percent said that their top challenge in executing programmatic strategy is audience targeting, according to newly-released survey data. MarketingProfs

Facebook, Google and Apple Announce New Emoji Updates for World Emoji Day
Marketers now have access to new emoji to tell brand stories, as Apple, Facebook and Google each announced a selection of new emoji options including a magic wand, teapot, drum, and piñata, the firms recently announced in conjunction with World Emoji Day. Social Media Today

ANA Finds Content Marketing Budgets Rose Sharply Prior To COVID-19
Content marketing advertising budgets were up some 73 percent on average over the past two years before the pandemic, with 63 percent of content marketing services being conducted internally — two of several findings of interest to digital marketers contained in a recently-released Association of National Advertisers (ANA) report. MediaPost

Google Adds New Ad Tools, Including Updated Visual Options and Prompts for Search Ads
New responsive search advertising personalization and curation features have been rolling out in Google’s latest update, along with enhanced branding tools including new layouts and updated dynamic ads, the search giant recently announced. Social Media Today

2020 July 24 Statistics Image

65% of Americans think brands should take a stand against racism, study says
Some 65 percent of U.S. adults believe that brands ought to take a stand against racism, while 56 percent of consumers said that they are the most willing to purchase from those brands that speak out in opposition to racism — two findings of interest to digital marketers in recently-released survey data. Marketing Dive

Marketers to focus ad spend on regional, digital media in 2020’s 2nd half
During the second half of 2020 some 75 percent of marketers plan to use paid social and display ads, while budgets are expected to drop by 12 percent during the third quarter and 7.5 percent in the fourth, according to recently-released study data. Marketing Dive

Snapchat Adds Brand Profiles as it Looks to Expand its Business Appeal
Snapchat has launched new features targeted at brands utilizing the platform, with a pilot program that gives brands a selection of new showcase options including story posts and highlighted Snaps collections, the firm recently announced. Social Media Today

Why Video is the King of Content for Marketers – 2020 Survey
76 percent of marketers have attributed positive return on investment (ROI) from using video, and some 86 percent expect to use more video content in future marketing campaigns — two of several findings of interest to digital marketers in newly-released survey data. Business 2 Community

ON THE LIGHTER SIDE:

2020 July 24 Marketoonist Comic Image

A lighthearted look at “customer experience management” by Marketoonist Tom Fishburne — Marketoonist

Former StarCraft 2 Pro Has Highest Microsoft Excel APM in Office — The Hard Times

TOPRANK MARKETING & CLIENTS IN THE NEWS:

  • Dell Technologies — B2B Marketers Get Down To Business With Digital During COVID-19 — AdExchanger
  • Joshua Nite — What’s Trending: Get Proactive With Planning — LinkedIn (client)
  • SAP — Marketers on Fire: SAP Global CMO Alicia Tillman — Chief Marketer
  • TopRank Marketing — 23 Best Influencer Marketing Agencies That Can Help You Grow — Martech Cube
  • Lee Odden — IABC Monthly Meeting July 16, 2020 [VIDEO] — IABC Minnesota
  • Lee Odden — 125+ Powerful Marketing Quotes To Inspire Your Strategy — Apolline Adiju
  • Lee Odden — 28 Social Media Experts to Learn From (Listed by Platform and Skill) — Social Agency Scout
  • Dell Boomi — How employee buy-in drove results for a B2B marketing campaign — AdAge

Have you come across your own top B2B content marketing or digital advertising stories from the past week of news? Please let us know in the comments below.

Thank you for taking the time to join us, and we hope that you’ll return back next Friday for another collection of the most relevant B2B and digital marketing industry news. In the meantime, you can follow us at @toprank on Twitter for even more timely daily news. Also, don’t miss the full video summary on our TopRank Marketing TV YouTube Channel.

The post B2B Marketing News: Podcast Downloads Climb, Social & Display Ad Spend Rising, Snapchat’s Brand Profiles, & Google’s Latest Ad Tools appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.


Source: SEO blog

The Campaign Comeback: What to Do When Content Fails — Best of Whiteboard Friday

We’ve all been there: you plan, launch, and eagerly await the many returns on a content campaign, only to be disappointed when it falls flat. But all is not lost: there are clever ways to give your failed campaigns a second chance at life and an opportunity to earn the links you missed out on the first time. In this popular Whiteboard Friday from 2018, MozCon speaker Shannon McGuirk graciously gives us a five-step plan for breathing new life into a dead content campaign.

What to do when content fails.

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Hi, Moz fans. Welcome to this edition of Whiteboard Friday. My name is Shannon McGuirk. I’m the Head of PR and Content at a UK-based digital marketing agency called Aira.

Now, throughout my time, I’ve launched a number of creative content and digital PR campaigns, too many to mention. But the ones that really stick into my head are the campaign fails, the ones that got away from the link numbers that I wanted to achieve and the ones that were quite painful from the client-side and stakeholder-side.

Now, over the last couple of years, I’ve built up a couple of steps and tactics that essentially will help me get campaigns back on track, and I wanted to take you through them today. So, today, I’m going to be talking to you about content campaign comebacks and what to do if your content campaign fails.

Step one: Reevaluate your outreach efforts

Now, take it right back to when you first launched the campaign.

  • Have you contacted the right journalists?
  • Have you gone to the right publications?
  • Be realistic. Now, at this point, remember to be realistic. It might not be a good idea to start going for the likes of ABC News and The Daily Telegraph. Bring it down a level, go to industry blogs, more niche publications, the ones that you’re more likely to get traction with.
  • Do your research. Essentially, is what I’m saying.
  • Less is always more in my eyes. I’ve seen prospecting and media lists that have up to 500 contacts on there that have fired out blank, cold outreach emails. For me, that’s a boo-boo. I would rather have 50 people on that media list that I know their first name, I know the last three articles that they’ve written, and on top of that, I can tell you which publications they’ve been at, so I know what they’re interested in. It’s going to really increase your chances of success when you relaunch.

Step two: Stories vs. statements

So this is when you need to start thinking about stories versus statements. Strip it right back and start to think about that hook or that angle that your whole campaign is all about. Can you say this in one sentence? If you can get it in one sentence, amazing because that’s the core thing that you are going to be communicating to journalists.

Now, to make this really tangible so that you can understand what I’m saying, I’ve got an example of a statement versus a story for a recent campaign that we did for an automotive client of ours. So here’s my example of a statement. “Client X found that the most dangerous roads in the UK are X, Y, Z.” That’s the statement. Now, for the story, let’s spice it up a little bit. “New data reveals that 8 out of 10 of the most dangerous roads in the UK are in London as cyclist deaths reach an all-time high.”

Can you see the difference between a story and a statement? I’m latching it into something in society that’s really important at the moment, because cyclist deaths are reaching an all-time high. On top of that, I’m giving it a punchy stat straightaway and then tying it into the city of London.

Step three: Create a package

So this seems like a bit of a no-brainer and a really obvious one, but it’s so incredibly important when you’re trying to bring your content campaign back from the dead. Think about creating a package. We all know that journalists are up against tight deadlines. They have KPIs in terms of the articles that they need to churn out on a daily basis. So give them absolutely everything that they need to cover your campaign.

I’ve put together a checklist for you, and you can tick them off as you go down.

  • Third-party expert or opinion. If you’re doing something around health and nutrition, why don’t you go out and find a doctor or a nutritionist that can give you comment for free — because remember, you’ll be doing the hard work for their PR team — to include within any press releases that you’re going to be writing.
  • Make sure that your data and your methodology is watertight. Prepare a methodology statement and also get all of your data and research into a Google sheet that you can share with journalists in a really open and transparent way.
  • Press release. It seems really simple, but get a well-written press release or piece of supporting copy written out well ahead of the relaunch timing so that you’ve got assets to be able to give a journalist. They can take snippets of that copy, mold it, adapt it, and then create their own article off the back of it.
  • New designs & images. If you’ve been working on any new designs and images, pop them on a Google shared drive and share that with the press. They can dip into this guide as and when they need it and ensure that they’ve got a visual element for their potential article.
  • Exclusive options. One final thing here that can occasionally get overlooked is you want to be holding something back. Whether that’s some really important stats, a comment from the MD or the CEO, or just some extra designs or images for graphics, I would keep them in your back pocket, because you may get the odd journalist at a really high DA/authority publication, such as the Mail Online or The Telegraph, ask for something exclusive on behalf of their editor.

Step four: Ask an expert

Start to think about working with journalists and influencers in a different way than just asking them to cover your creative content campaigns and generate links. Establish a solid network of freelance journalists that you can ask directly for feedback on any ideas. Now, it can be any aspect of the idea that you’re asking for their feedback on. You can go for data, pitch angles, launch timings, design and images. It doesn’t really matter. But they know what that killer angle and hook needs to be to write an article and essentially get you a link. So tap into it and ask them what they think about your content campaign before you relaunch.

Step five: Re-launch timings

This is the one thing that you need to consider just before the relaunch, but it’s the relaunch timings. Did you actually pay enough attention to this when you did your first initial launch? Chances are you may not have, and something has slipped through the net here.

  • Awareness days. So be sure to check awareness days. Now, this can be anything from National Proposal Day for a wedding client, or it can be the Internet of Things Day for a bigger electrical firm or something like that. It doesn’t really matter. But if you can hook it onto an awareness day, it means that there’s already going to be that interest in the media, journalists will be writing about the topic, and there’s a way in for your content.
  • World events. Again, keep in mind anything to do with elections or perhaps world disasters, such as tornadoes and bad weather, because it means that the press is going to be heavily oversaturated with anything to do with them, and therefore you might want to hold back on your relaunch until the dust is settled and giving your content campaign the best chance of success in round two.
  • Seasonality. Now, this isn’t just Christmas. It’s also Easter, Mother’s Day, Valentine’s Day. Think about the time of year you’re launching and whether your content campaign is actually relevant at that time of year. For example, back home in the UK, we don’t tend to launch content campaigns in the run-up to Christmas if it’s not Christmas content, because it’s not relevant and the press are already interested in that one seasonal thing.
  • Holidays. Holidays in the sense of half-term and summer holidays, because it means that journalists won’t be in the office, and therefore you’re reducing your chances of success when you’re calling them or when you’re writing out your emails to pitch them.

So there are my five steps for your content campaign comebacks. I know you’ve all been there too, guys, and I would love to hear how you got over some of these hurdles in bringing your content campaigns back to life. Feel free to comment below. I hope you guys join me soon for another Whiteboard Friday. Thanks.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

B2B Influencer Marketing Advice from 9 Top B2B Influencers

Human Figures Showing Influence Image

Human Figures Showing Influence Image

Top marketers understand the value of integrating influencer marketing into their marketing strategy. In fact, 55% of marketers believe they get better customers from influencer marketing according to an Influencer Marketing Hub survey. For B2B brands, influencer marketing is a way to partner with industry experts who can add value to the brand’s content.

As a brand, how can you provide mutual value and a great experience for the thought leaders you engage?

I went straight to some of my top sources to ask their thoughts on the best way for B2B brands to collaborate with them. What stood out to me, was the way their key points aligned with how a brand might develop a marketing strategy.

Let’s start with understanding who your audience is and who they follow. Most B2B brands have personas created for their customers. Now think about how you can mirror those customer personas to align with those authentic thought leaders who you’re looking to engage with.

1 — Tim Crawford: Authenticity is Key

Tim Crawford

When I want to understand CIOs, I call Tim Crawford, CIO Strategic Advisor at AVOA, who has worked with nearly all of the top B2B tech brands. Tim asserts that by knowing the persona you are going after, you can ensure your messaging, and that the approach has authenticity. He also reminded me that opinion doesn’t replace experience, and Tim has plenty of valuable experience.

The value of authentic experience stands out to your audience. It is not merely opinion, but proven knowledge. “Consider the personas to target and leverage voices that bring authenticity to the messaging which will, in turn, build trust with customers,” Tim says.

[bctt tweet=”“Consider the personas to target and leverage voices that bring authenticity to the messaging which will, in turn, build trust with customers.” — Tim Crawford @tcrawford” username=”toprank”]

2 —Ramon Ray: Seek Influencer Excitement

Ramon Ray

Entrepreneur, keynote speaker, bestselling author and editor and founder of Smart Hustle Magazine Ramon Ray encourages brands to, “Look to work for influencers that are excited to work with you and your product or service.”

When it comes to excitement, Ramon’s comes shining through. In an interview we partnered with him on for Dell Outlet*, his smile and enthusiasm were felt even with just audio.

[bctt tweet=”“Look to work for influencers that are excited to work with you and your product or service.” — Ramon Ray @ramonray” username=”toprank”]

3 — Helen Yu: Let Your B2B Brand’s Values Shine

Helen Yu

What does your brand stand for? What value do you bring to your customers? “It is important for B2B brands to crystallize what their brands stand for, whom their target audiences are and how they would measure the success prior to engaging B2B influencers,” says Helen Yu of Tigon Advisory Corp. She advises finding influencers who represent the organization’s values and who can contribute to sustainable business growth.

Helen also encourages brands to share their value proposition with thought leaders to help them focus their efforts in the right direction for amplifying the brand’s vision.

[bctt tweet=”“To make the engagement more productive, I recommend that brands think about how they would describe their value in 3 words. Influencers can then focus on how we deliver the work reflecting and amplifying their value.” — Helen Yu @YuHelenYu” username=”toprank”]

You have a strategic marketing plan. Does that plan have influencer marketing as a tactic? If so, then be sure to include an engagement plan for any work with influencers. More than one influencer has told me stories of being asked to participate in an event — online or in person — only to find that there was not an actionable plan to bring the partnership to life, or if there was, it was delivered to the influencer at the last minute.

4 — Tamara McCleary: Focus & Specificity

Tamara McCleary

Keynote speaker and Thulium CEO Tamara McCleary recommends that you “Have a plan for your influencers. Do you know what you want your influencers to do? Do you have a clear strategy for utilizing them? One of the biggest mistakes organizations make when bringing in influencers is a lack of focus and specificity.”

[bctt tweet=”“One of the biggest mistakes organizations make when bringing in influencers is a lack of focus and specificity.” — Tamara McCleary @TamaraMcCleary” username=”toprank”]

5 — Ian Moyse: Empowering Influencers

Ian Moyse

Ian Moyse, cloud social influencer for a range of global brands commented, “Come to an influencer with a clear brief and clear budget offering. Brief them and provide good supporting info and links to empower them to do a good job for you. Provide them imagery, #hashtags, and @handles upfront to use. Where possible create images for the influencer such as quote cards with their photo, and share and engage with the influencers content from your corporate brand account, and encourage your staff to do the same.”

[bctt tweet=”“Brief influencers and provide good supporting information to empower them to do a good job for you.” — Ian Moyse @imoyse” username=”toprank”]

6 — Michael Fisher, Jr.: Better Communication Avoids Confusion

Michael Fisher

Michael Fisher, Jr., senior systems analyst at Whitcraft Group, cyber security consultant and technology evangelist, confirms good communication is key.

“My one top tip would be overall good communication around the program, which may include meetings, PowerPoint slides and a schedule. Without good communication [the partnership] may lead to confusion and overall less productivity,” says Michael.

[bctt tweet=”“My one top tip would be overall good communication around the program. Without good communication the partnership may lead to confusion and overall less productivity.” — Michael Fisher, Jr. @Fisher85M” username=”toprank”]

7 —Dan Gingiss: Give Audiences the Answers they Crave

Dan Gingiss

Chief Experience Officer at The Experience Maker LLC and CX thought leader Dan Gingiss encourages brands to engage influencers to elevate their customer experience.

“By giving influencers the platform to engage with your audience, you can facilitate great customer experiences by providing the answers your audience craves,” Dan shared.

Influencers allow you to add credibility to your brand’s point of view (POV), move prospects down the purchase funnel, and support customers in successfully deploying your product or service — all in a way that builds community and facilitates open conversations.

It’s important to keep in mind who you’re engaging and consider their primary business goals. “Remember that influencers are often solopreneurs who are trying to build or grow their own business. So while they may be willing to help you grow your business too, ultimately they have to do what’s right for their own business first. Their personal brand is their livelihood, so be careful asking for the moon and offering nothing in return,” said Dan.

He reminds B2B brands that “The best influencer programs highlight an authentic relationship between the influencer and the brand, and the best way to accomplish that is to ensure a mutually beneficial program.”

[bctt tweet=”“The best influencer programs highlight an authentic relationship between the influencer and the brand, and the best way to accomplish that is to ensure a mutually beneficial program.” — Dan Ginigiss @dgingiss” username=”toprank”]

8 — Shonali Burke: Be Prepared & Specific

Shonali Burke

How you approach an influencer can set the tone for the relationship. As someone who has been on both sides of the table as a consultant looking to engage influencers and as a sought-after thought leader on digital strategy, brand elevation and analytics, Shonali Burke, President and CEO of Shonali Burke Burke Consulting, Inc. shared a great messaging tip.  “If, as a brand, you’re looking to work with influencers, you will almost always get a response if, in your very first communication, you lead with a very specific ask, which shows at least equal benefit to them as to you,” she advises.

Shonali expands on such an approach, “This shows that a) you’ve done your research; and b) that you really understand what ‘influencer’ marketing is about. Simply asking for a call or meeting ‘to introduce ourselves to you’ is unlikely to work; (that’s what the internet is for). But if you have a really specific ask, e.g. you think they’d be a great potential speaker, etc., you’re almost guaranteed to get a response — as opposed to… crickets.”

[bctt tweet=”“If, as a brand, you’re looking to work with influencers, you will almost always get a response if, in your very first communication, you lead with a very specific ask, which shows at least equal benefit to them as to you.” @shonali” username=”toprank”]

Of course you measure the success of your campaigns. But have you thought of sharing that with your partners? “If you’re not sure what to do, ask. Many influencers have years of experience in serving the needs of B2B brands,” says Ramon.

Ramon invites B2B brands to “Know what your measure of success is and share this with the influencer.”

[bctt tweet=”“Know what your measure of success is and share this with the influencer.” — Ramon Ray @ramonray” username=”toprank”]

While it can be easy to do a flashy one-time campaign, B2B brands with the most success build brand awareness with a community of influencers who they trust and build strong relationships with over time. Tamara McCleary advises, “Think long-term. It’s important to look at an influencer program as a long-term relationship-building program. A long-term program will allow your brand to create true brand advocates, powerful brand evangelists, and raving fans.”

[bctt tweet=”“A long-term influencer program will allow your brand to create true brand advocates, powerful brand evangelists, and raving fans.” — Tamara McCleary @TamaraMcCleary” username=”toprank”]

9 — Lee Odden: Ongoing Influence

Lee Odden

The TopRank Marketing blog has a new Always On Influence series exploring lasting relationships with influencers. These lasting relationships can be a foundation to grow in the years ahead.

[bctt tweet=”“Relationships take time and that means influencer engagement is an ongoing effort, not just when influencers are needed to provide content or promotion.” — Lee Odden, TopRank Marketing CEO @leeodden” username=”toprank”]

B2B Influencer Relations Tips

I’m not an influencer, but I have learned the best way to work with anyone is to have a conversation with them upfront. Then keep the conversation going to drive the best collaboration and create successful outcomes for your brand.

I appreciate the candor and openness of these amazing leaders, who continue to allow me to have an ongoing conversation with them.

Remember these key tips top B2B thought leaders shared for building successful relationships and campaigns:

  • Be Authentic
  • Align influencers with your audience personas
  • Find influencers who are excited to work with your brand
  • Share your brand values and value proposition
  • Have a specific ask upfront
  • Have a plan and brief the influencers
  • Create great experiences
  • Share how you want to measure success
  • Build a lasting relationship

Are you ready to take the leap to the next level of influencer marketing? Learn more about always on influencer marketing or contact us today.

* Dell Outlet is a TopRank Marketing client.

The post B2B Influencer Marketing Advice from 9 Top B2B Influencers appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.


Source: SEO blog

17+ Top Virtual Marketing Conferences for Summer 2020 & Beyond

Smiling Woman at Computer Image

Smiling Woman at Computer Image

Virtual marketing conferences offer a wealth of benefits to marketers looking to learn and increase brand awareness, and in the current crisis they represent the only event opportunities for marketers.

How do you go about finding events that match your business and B2B marketing needs, however?

With in-person marketing events not likely until well into 2021, more virtual events than ever taking place, making it harder than ever to find the ones that can best help build your business, expand your communication opportunities, and offer the most relevant new industry education from top marketing industry experts.

MarTech Today Chart

Marketers are getting more out of virtual events, too — with 75 percent in a recent survey saying they were satisfied with their virtual event experiences. Online events also hold their own unique advantages.

“Bringing events online has its downsides, naturally — there’s no substitute for personally meeting and interacting with all the valuable contacts attending a conference — but there are some key advantages,” Amanda Bulat, senior content marketing manager at LinkedIn Sales & Marketing Solutions recently observed.

“Virtual events are easier for people to attend (with no geographic restrictions), less resource-intensive to host, and can make it easier to capture lead gen info,” she added.

Expanding on our previous listing of “8 Virtual SEO Conferences for B2B Marketers,” for summer 2020 and beyond we’ve gathered together a collection of some of the top virtual marketing events, and we’re happy to present the list here, in chronological order.

Virtual Marketing Conferences For Summer 2020 & Beyond

Adobe Experience Makers Live — #ExperienceMakersLive
When: July 22-23, 2020
Theme: Digital Experiences
About: Adobe* Experience Makers Live is focused on creating long-term business success through inclusive digital experiences, featuring speakers including author Dr. Brené Brown, Microsoft’s Shelley Bransten, Forrester’s Joana de Quintanilha, and Adobe’s Marissa Dacay.

ContentTECH Summit — #ContentTECH
When: August 10-12, 2020
Theme: Content Marketing
About: ContentTECH Summit explores the ever-increasing importance of content marketing to create, manage, deliver and scale enterprise content and provide customers with better digital experiences, and features top speakers such as Mastercard Worldwide’s Wendy Richardson, author Alan Zweibel, and our own CEO Lee Odden.

Digital Summit At Home — #DSatHome
When: August 11-13, 2020
Theme: Digital Marketing
About: Digital Summit At Home examines digital marketing in over 30 virtual sessions, and features top speakers such as author Seth Godin, LinkedIn’s* Ty Heath, and our own senior director of digital strategy Ashley Zeckman.

IABC MN Convergence Summit — #IABCMN
When: August 12-13, 2020
Theme: Business Communications
About: IABC MN Convergence Summit weaves together business and academic experts to learn how to overcome today’s business communication challenges and explore how to build reputation, connect with audiences, and influence stakeholders, and features speakers such as Best Buy’s Andy Gorski, Deluxe Corporation’s Devon Block, along with our CEO Lee Odden who will present “In Search of Trust: How Authentic Content Drives Customer Experience.”

INBOUND 2020 — #INBOUND2020
When: September 22-23, 2020
Theme: Marketing & Sales
About: INBOUND 2020 presents some of the biggest names and brightest minds in sales and marketing and other industries, and offers speakers from firms including Intuit, HubSpot and others.

AI Summit Silicon Valley — #AISummit
When: September 30-October 1, 2020
Theme: Artificial Intelligence (AI)
About: The Virtual AI Summit Silicon Valley 2020 presents all things artificial intelligence for business marketers, and includes leading speakers from Google, Lyft, Boeing, Lenovo and more.

2020 B2B Next Conference & Exhibition — #B2BNext
When: September 29-30, 2020
Theme: Marketing & Sales
About: The 2020 B2B Next Conference & Exhibition explores the digital-first B2B economy with a focus on collaboration in eCommerce, and features top speakers including Grainger CEO D.G. Macpherson, Graybar CEO Kathy Mazzarella, RBC Capital Markets’ Marketing Manager Mark Mahaney and others.

Advertising Week Virtual — #AW2020
When: September 29-October 8, 2020
Theme: Marketing & Sales
About: Advertising Week Virtual serves as a worldwide gathering of marketing, advertising, technology and brand professionals, offering major speakers including Google VP of Marketing, EMEA Yonca Dervisoglu, SNAP VP of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Baroness Oona King, Interpublic Group CEO Michael Roth and others, for eight days and six global markets filled with unlimited ideas.

Fast Co. Innovation Festival — #FCFestival
When: October 5-9, 2020
Theme: Innovation
About: The Fast Co. Innovation Festival offers business inspiration by leaders making a difference through technology and creativity, with a powerful slate of global speakers to be announced.

MarTech — #MarTechConf
When: October 6-8, 2020
Theme: MarTech
About: Martech Conference focuses on actionable tactics in marketing technology for solving marketing problems, with top speakers to be announced.

Content Marketing World — #CMWorld
When: October 13-16, 2020
Theme: Content Marketing
About: Content Marketing World conference and expo explores the best in content marketing to grow your business and inspire your audience, featuring top speakers including Beverly Jackson of Activision Blizzard, Jay Baer of Convince & Convert, MJ DePalma of Microsoft Advertising, and others.

ANA 2020 Masters of Marketing Conference — #ANA
When: October 21-23, 2020
Theme: B2B Marketing
The Association of National Advertisers’s 2020 ANA Masters of Marketing Conference is set to examine brand marketing practices related to digital and social, and to help brands and businesses navigate these difficult times and drive sustained success, with a lineup of speakers to be announced.

B2B Sales and Marketing Exchange — #B2BSMX
When: October 26-28, 2020
Theme: Marketing & Sales
About: B2B Sales and Marketing Exchange Online Experience brings together thought leaders in ABM, revenue marketing and demand generation, including top speakers to be announced.

Sitecore Symposium 2020 — #SitecoreSYM
When: October 26-28, 2020
Theme: Marketing Automation
About: B2B marketers looking to explore the marketing automation landscape can attend Sitecore Symposium 2020 and learn the next generation of strategies and tactics, with a lineup of major speakers to be announced.

Brand ManageCamp — #BMC2020
When: October 27-29, 2020
Theme: Brand Management
About: Brand ManageCamp’s conference explores the insights, tools, strategy and leadership inspiration to drive new brand growth, featuring a lineup a speakers including Joe Pulizzi of the Content Marketing Institute, author Shep Hyken, author Carla Johnson, and others.

MarketingProfs B2B Forum — #MPB2B
When:November 3-6, 2020
Theme: B2B Marketing
About: At MarketingProfs B2B Forum top leaders, innovators, and people who make things happen gather to share their secrets to success, with a stellar lineup of speakers to be including keynotes by author David Meerman Scott, author April Dunford, and writer and comedian Sarah Cooper.

Dreamforce 2020 — #DF20
When: November 9-12, 2020
Theme: Customer Relationship Management (CRM)
About: Dreamforce brings together the Salesforce community of thought leaders and industry pioneers for education and inspiration, and with over 2,700 sessions its one of the latest business conferences. Look for speakers to be announced in the lead-up to the event, and also check out Dreamforce’s virtual Leading Through Change series.

Gear Up Your 2020 Virtual Marketing Events

via GIPHY

We hope you’ve found a number of new and exciting virtual events to attend on our list to make the most of the rest of 2020, and that the learning you’ll experience from either these virtual conferences or the many others available will help you achieve new levels of B2B marketing success this year and beyond.

If you’re also considering hosting a virtual event of your own, check out “Boost Your Virtual Event By Taking These Actions Before, During, and After,” by Kylee Lessard, associate product marketing manager of LinkedIn Pages & Elevate at LinkedIn.

At TopRank Marketing we’ve explored the power of events both virtual and in-person for B2B marketers, especially those who incorporate influencer marketing, in a number of articles, and here are five to help you get the most from your virtual 2020 marketing events:

* Adobe and LinkedIn are TopRank Marketing clients.

The post 17+ Top Virtual Marketing Conferences for Summer 2020 & Beyond appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.


Source: SEO blog

Proximity Third: A Deeper Dive into a Local Ranking Factors Surprise

Image credit: J.B. Hill

What’s the good of a survey if it doesn’t result in at least a few surprises?

I know my own eyebrows leapt skyward when the data first came in from the Moz State of the Local SEO Industry 2020 Survey and I saw that, in a break with tradition, participants had placed user-to-business proximity at a lowly third place in terms of influencing Google local pack rankings. Just a year ago, our respondents had voted it #1.

If you’re feeling startled, too, here’s our chance to take a more granular look at the data and see if we can offer some useful theories for proximity’s drop in perceived dominance.

First, a quick definition of user-to-business proximity

What do local SEOs mean when they speak of user-to-business proximity? Imagine an Internet searcher is standing in Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, looking on their phone, laptop or other device for “pizza”. Local SEOs observe that it’s more typical for Google to show that person Pasquale’s Pizzeria, right next to the park, than to show them Yummy Pizza across town in the Glen Park neighborhood.

Make an identical query as you move around your city and you’re likely to see the local pack and mapped results change a little or a lot, depending on the competitiveness, density and diversity of local commerce in your town, relative to where you are standing when you search.

In 2014, the annual survey of world class local SEO experts known as the Local Search Ranking Factors survey rated proximity as having the 8th greatest influence on local pack rankings. By 2017 and in subsequent editions, proximity had hit #1. As mentioned, the 2019 Moz State of the Local SEO Industry report placed it first. But this year, something changed…

Proximity third: the data

Our large survey group of over 1,000 respondents ranked Google My Business elements (keywords in name, categories, etc.) and Google review elements (count, sentiment, owner responses, etc.) as having a greater influence on local pack rankings than does user-to-business proximity.

Now, let’s take a closer look at which participants ordered ranking influence in this way.

GMB elements ranked #1

It’s fascinating to see that, on average, agency workers rated Google My Business elements as having the most influence on local pack rankings. These would be practitioners who are presumably working directly with local clients on a day-to-day basis and continuously studying local packs.

Google review elements ranked #2

Overall, Google review elements rank second, and within this statistic, it’s survey takers who market one small local business who rate the influence of reviews most highly, on average. These would presumably be independent business owners or their in-house marketing staff who are regularly eyeing the local packs to see what seems to move the needle.

Proximity ranked #3

Overall, the proximity of the searcher to the place of business ranks third, and within this group, it’s agency workers who, on average, rate the influence of proximity most highly. So, again, it’s this group of marketing professionals who are contributing to the depiction of proximity being of less influence than GMB factors.

Three theories for making sense of the proximity shift

I was startled enough by the data to begin considering how to account for it. I came up with three different theories that helped make more sense of this to me, personally.

1. Could respondents just be wrong?

Certainly, it’s fair to ask this. I’ll be honest — my first reaction to the data when it crossed my desk was, “Wait…this can’t be right. How can proximity be in third place?”

I thought about how the long-running Local Search Ranking Factors project, which is confined to local SEO experts, has been placing proximity first for several years, and how our survey group is inclusive of every type of job title involved in marketing local businesses. Owners, creative directors, writers, in-house and agency SEOs, and many other types of practitioners contribute to marketing local businesses and participate in our initiative. Could it be that respondents who don’t do day-to-day SEO work swayed this result?

But I stopped asking that question when I saw that it was, in fact, agency workers who had contributed most to this view of GMB factors outweighing proximity. Digital marketing brands offering local SEO as a service can’t be summarily written off as mistaken. So, next, I asked myself what these agency workers could be seeing that would make them rank proximity lower than two other factors.

2. Could “it depends” be making absolutes impossible?

Here’s the thing: sophisticated local SEO practitioners know that there actually is no absolute #1 local ranking factor. What shows up in a local pack depends hugely on Google’s understanding of intent and its varied treatment of different industries and keywords.

For example, Google can decide that for a query like “coffee near me”, the user wants the closest option, and will cluster results in a tight proximity to the searcher. Meanwhile, a customer in any location looking for “used car dealership” may see results skewed to a certain part of town where there’s an auto row filled with such businesses — a phenomenon long ago dubbed the “industry centroid” effect. But, for the user seeking something like “sports arena”, Google can believe there’s a willingness to drive further away and can make up a local pack of businesses all over a city, or even all over a state.

So, the truth is, dubbing any factor #1 is an oversimplification we put up with for the sake of giving some order to the chaos of Google results. Proximity may be the dominant influence for some queries, but definitely not for all of them.

Taking this into consideration, it could well be that our survey’s respondents who work at agencies are observing such a diversity of behavior from Google that they are losing confidence in pinning it all down to proximity as the leading factor. And this leads me to my third theory.

3. Could a desire for control be at play here?

Proximity can be problematic. In a separate question in our survey in which we asked whether Google’s emphasis on proximity was always generating high quality results, only 38.6% of respondents felt satisfied. Most of us are frequently encountering local pack results that may be closest, but not best. This can leave agencies and business owners feeling a bit dubious about Google and even a bit helpless about acting in an environment that often ranks mere nearness over quality.

Unless a business is willing to move to a different location which Google appears to be favoring for core search phrase targets, proximity isn’t really something you can optimize for. In this scenario, what is left to local business marketers that they can control?

Of course — it’s GMB factors and reviews. You can control what you name your business, what categories you choose, your use of Google posts and Q&A, your photos, videos, and description. You can control your review acquisition campaigns and your rate and quality of owner responses.

Seeing respondents weigh GMB elements above proximity made me wonder if the strong desire for being able to have some control over local pack outcomes might subconsciously cause subjects to give a slight bump to factors they can observably influence. I’m not a psychologist, but I know I’m always writing here at Moz about focusing on what you can control. It could be that this internal emphasis might cause me to give more importance to factors other than proximity. Just a theory, but one to consider, and I’d love to hear in the comments if you have different hypotheses!

Can we know the truth?

I was so intrigued by our survey’s results that I ran a very quick Twitter poll to take another snapshot of current sentiment about proximity. Most of my followers are interested in or involved with local SEO, so I was eager to see the outcome of this:

While a robust 66% placed proximity first, an interesting 34% didn’t. In other words, there just isn’t total agreement about this topic. Most revealingly, more than one respected SEO tweeted back at me, “It depends.”

This is why I believe that my second theory above is likely as close to the truth as we’re going to get. All surveys which aggregate anecdotal opinion must take into account the variety of respondents’ experiences. Consider:

  • If my agency specializes in working with convenience stores or coffee shops, proximity may well be ruling my workday because Google draws such a tight net around users for my target keywords.
  • If most of my clients operate tourist attractions or B2B brands, it could be that reviews or the names on Google Business profiles appear to shape my world much more than proximity does.
  • Or, I may have such a wide array of clients, each experiencing different Google behavior, that my overall confidence in putting proximity first has simply eroded the more I observe the variations in the results.

What we can say with certainty is that there has been a year-over-year shift in how participants in the Moz State of the Local SEO Industry 2020 survey rate the influence of proximity. They believe it’s less dominant than it was just a year ago. Knowing this may not change your local pack strategy, because as we’ve noted, you could never do much to influence proximity in the first place.

What takeaway can we glean, then, if there is no absolute #1 local ranking factor upon which all parties agree? I’d boil it down to this: our survey shows that participants are heavily focused on GMB factors and reviews. In your competitive landscape, awareness of these elements is lively, and your ability to compete means taking an active approach to managing what you can control.

Moz Local software offers one smart solution for taking maximum charge of your Google Business Profiles, and I’ll close here with my short list of links to assist you in marketing local businesses in Google’s competitive environment:

Curious about what other insights you’ll find in our survey? Download the full, free Moz State of the Local SEO Industry 2020 report.

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10 Inspiring B2B Marketers Who Spark Greatness

10 B2B Marketers Who Inspire Greatness Bio Photo Collage

10 B2B Marketers Who Inspire Greatness Bio Photo Collage

In the Oxford English Dictionary, the word inspiration is defined as “the process of being mentally stimulated to do or feel something, especially to do something creative.”

As B2B marketers working in unprecedented times, wouldn’t it be nice to be surrounded by inspiration to help us spur action, produce results, and make an impact? With organic traffic and conversions down for most industries due to COVID-19 and related business challenges, marketers are hard-pressed to adapt and overcome. Inspiration is certainly something we could all use to help us reach our goals.

So, if you’re looking for some B2B marketing inspiration, check out these 10 B2B marketers. They’re each doing inspiring things in a time where inspiration can be hard to find.

Meet 10 Inspiring B2B Marketers

Kirsten Allegri Williams
@kirstenallegriw
Chief Marketing Officer, Episerver

Kirsten Allegri Williams

As a CMO for a leading B2B technology company, Kirsten’s approach to today’s market is both thoughtful and inspirational.  “At this moment in history and for the foreseeable future, a brand’s digital presence makes up the entirety of how it reaches customers,” Kirsten recently observed. “The customer journey and the user experience on our screens is quite literally everything,” she added. Her focus on Episerver’s digital presence will no doubt make a big difference.

[bctt tweet=”“At this moment in history and for the foreseeable future, a brand’s digital presence makes up the entirety of how it reaches customers.” — Kirsten Allegri Williams @kirstenallegriw” username=”toprank”]

Rishi Dave
@RishiPDave
CMO, Vonage

Rishi Dave

Rishi Dave, CMO for Vonage, also highlights the immense need for conducting business online in the time of COVID-19. “While a great majority of the world’s daily life is disrupted, almost every organization is looking for ways to take their business online,” Rishi suggested. “It’s likely that we’ll look back in 10 years and recognize these few months in the Spring of 2020 as an inflection point,” he added. It’s clear that Rishi sees the global pandemic as a turning point for nearly all organizations and hopes it will inspire other B2B marketers to make the leap into a focus on digital experiences.

[bctt tweet=”“While a great majority of the world’s daily life is disrupted, almost every organization is looking for ways to take their business online.” — Rishi Dave @RishiPDave” username=”toprank”]

Amanda Brinkman
@amandakbrinkman
Chief Brand Officer, Deluxe

Amanda Brinkman

She’s the Chief Brand Officer at Deluxe, one of the most trusted information and technology services firms. But Amanda is also a top B2B marketer with an inspiring reminder for businesses and marketers trying to make it work in 2020. “You didn’t start your business from a place of weakness,” she says. “You started your business because you are strong and had something you wanted to bring the world.”

[bctt tweet=”“You didn’t start your business from a place of weakness. You started your business because you are strong and had something you wanted to bring the world.” — Amanda Brinkman @amandakbrinkman” username=”toprank”]

Shonodeep Modak
Chief Marketing Officer, North America, Schneider Electric

Shonodeep Modak

From helping deliver care packages to low-income families impacted by COVID-19 and unrest in Hong Kong to hosting a new webinar series, Innovation Talks, to help their customers adapt to the COVID-19 era, Shonodeep Modak and Schneider Electric are doing plenty of inspiring things that are all data-informed. “You really have to understand how shoppers buy, shopper insights, how people decide what to buy at a Wal-Mart or go to the Quick Lube, the analytics around the demographics of cars and the interests of people and how you target them,” he advises.

[bctt tweet=”“You really have to understand how shoppers buy, shopper insights, how people decide what to buy, the analytics around the demographics of cars and the interests of people and how you target them.” — Shonodeep Modak @SchneiderNA” username=”toprank”]

Beverly Jackson
@BevJack
VP of Communication and Social, Activision Blizzard

Beverly Jackson

With a career starting in environmental work, it might surprise you to hear that Beverly Jackson is now the VP of Communication and Social at Activision Blizzard, one of the largest video game publishers and developers in the world. While her journey from environmentalist to social media maven is inspirational in its own right, she also has an inspiring take on the use of social media. “The great thing about social media is that it allows brands to create one-on-one relationships with their customers and prospects — not the marketers,” she says. “And the bottom line is: marketers should never get in the way of that relationship.”

[bctt tweet=”“The great thing about social media is that it allows brands to create one-on-one relationships with their customers and prospects — not the marketers.” — Beverly Jackson @BevJack” username=”toprank”]

Amisha Gandhi
@AmishaGandhi
VP, Influencer Marketing & Communications, SAP Ariba*

Amisha Gandhi

Recently named as one of PR Week’s 2020 Women to Watch, Amisha Gandhi is a B2B marketing powerhouse. She’s especially skilled at leveraging influencer marketing to inspire her target audience and customers. “Working with influencers, to co-create content, delivers value and can inspire audiences to take action,” she suggests.

[bctt tweet=”“Working with influencers, to co-create content, delivers value and can inspire audiences to take action.” — Amisha Gandhi @AmishaGandhi” username=”toprank”]

Alicia Tillman
@aliciatillman
Global CMO, SAP*

Alicia Tillman

She’s one of Forbes’ 2019 World’s 50 Most Influential CMOs, and is sure to make the list again in 2020. Alicia Tillman has taken an inspirational approach as the Global CMO for SAP, doubling down on the customer experience. She says, “It’s all about the experience! Our new normal has pushed many to think outside the box and deliver unique, memorable experiences.”

[bctt tweet=”“It’s all about the experience! Our new normal has pushed many to think outside the box and deliver unique, memorable experiences.” — Alicia Tillman @aliciatillman” username=”toprank”]

Rani Mani
@ranimani0707
Head of Employee Advocacy, Adobe*

Rani Mani

Serving as the Head of Employee Advocacy for Adobe, a software company that has a home in almost every enterprise, Rani Mani has a unique view into how COVID-19 is impacting the future of work. Having helped Adobe with campaigns around the future of work, Rani gives some inspirational advice: “Staying relevant could mean reinventing and resetting multiple times in one’s career.”

[bctt tweet=”“Staying relevant could mean reinventing and resetting multiple times in one’s career.” — Rani Mani @ranimani0707″ username=”toprank”]

Adam Singer
@AdamSinger
CMO, Think3

Adam Singer

Adam Singer is the CMO for a billion dollar fund with a variety of startups under his leadership. With such a diverse portfolio of startups, Adam and his team are introducing inspiring new products that serve a unique, clear need in the time of COVID. “Many schools will choose to have virtual classrooms this fall. We’re excited with all the initial interest in our portfolio company, Sococo* for Classrooms and have heard lots of great feedback from early testers.”

[bctt tweet=”“Many schools will choose to have virtual classrooms this fall. We’re excited with all the initial interest in our portfolio company, @Sococo for Classrooms and have heard lots of great feedback from early testers.” @AdamSinger” username=”toprank”]

Amanda Todorovich
@amandatodo
Senior Director, Digital Marketing/Health Content, Cleveland Clinic

Amanda Todorovich

Working in healthcare, there has been a surge in demand for helpful content from B2B marketers like Amanda Todorovich. Amanda and the Cleveland Clinic have certainly answered the call with new webinars, blog posts, and more. On COVID-19 and healthcare marketing, she says, “Healthcare marketers need to drive forward with focus and new capabilities to achieve better business results within the reality of COVID-19. Now more than ever, marketing and communication executives are critical to redefining and communicating the future trajectory of healthcare brands.”

[bctt tweet=”“Now more than ever, marketing and communication executives are critical to redefining and communicating the future trajectory of healthcare brands.” — Amanda Todorovich @amandatodo” username=”toprank”]

Inspiration Can Come From Anywhere

It’s true that inspiration is already all around us. But it’s not always easy to see. Give the above B2B marketers a follow to keep your feeds on LinkedIn, Twitter, and elsewhere filled with inspiring marketing campaigns, advice, and best practices.

Unsure how to market your organization during COVID-19? Read our CEO Lee Odden’s thoughts on marketing during a pandemic.

* SAP, Adobe, and Sococo are TopRank Marketing clients.

The post 10 Inspiring B2B Marketers Who Spark Greatness appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.


Source: SEO blog

Blog Topics: How to find Your Sweet Spot (Even in a Boring Niche)

I hate to tell you, but Googling “blog topic ideas” is not going to give you the content you should be creating.

Not all content is created equal. Letting the internet tell you what to blog about leads to mediocrity. Mediocrity is fine in some cases, like forcing yourself to show up at the gym at 5:00 p.m. when you’d much rather call it a day. But if you’re going to try and stand out in the very crowded search results page, you won’t stand a chance.

The reality is, it’s hard

The web is overrun with companies that have bigger budgets than you and can churn out content every day. Meanwhile, you’re lucky to get a blog post out once a month. Where you put your time can make or break your digital efforts. How do you compete? What content will grow your traffic month after month and year after year?

If you’re going to put your time into creating and promoting a blog post, and hope to get results, you owe it to yourself to figure out what you’re best suited to blog about.

Forget the 50 handy tools and blog topic lists

The internet will say: “Just research topics using these 50 handy tools and you’ll get a ton of ideas!” That’s cancelled. Slogging away with topics every week for three-plus years taught me that this advice — though well-intentioned — quickly wears thin. Especially if your topic or industry is niche.

So here’s what I would recommend instead:

  • Figure out what your people care about
  • Find where the magic happens
  • Keyword research your topics
  • Brainstorm, categorize, and prioritize
  • Execute

And that’s what we’ll cover. It may take a little more time, but it will give you ideas and direction you can use for months.

Figure out your people

The best way to find blog topic ideas is to look at your audience. What are their pain points, concerns, and obsessions when it comes to your products? Easier said than done sometimes, but chances are you already have at least an inkling on why they choose you. So start there and backtrack.

If you’re lucky, you’ll have some research or set personas to use. If you aren’t, make do. The point isn’t to get hung up on idealizing your audience, or nailing down that brand of tofu sausage they like. The point is to nail down their pain points and desires and move on.

Think about your best customers: How are you helping them live their best life? What are you helping them solve? What frustrates them about your line of services? When do they realize they need someone like you?

Take the time to understand the people that currently buy from you. So you can find more of them. In some cases, finding your audience is easy. In other instances, your audience is really diverse, or you just want what your neighbor’s having. Getting the perfect audience persona isn’t super important. Just get a good enough portrait, and move on.

Find where the magic happens

I barely passed math in college but one thing I did get was Venn diagrams. Two circles, and the magic is where they intersect, cool.

When mulling over what to blog about, I use this type of diagram to decide what I am best positioned to talk about. On the left would be the audience interests and concerns that you figured out in the previous step. On the right, your expertise. In the middle, you get a set of themes that you can specialize in. This doubles as the position you can take in your customer’s world. If you can pinpoint a mix of exciting, aspirational, and realistic themes here, that’s best.

It’s one thing to know what your audience likes. But chase that, and you’re competing with Medium or Buzzfeed.

It’s another to know what you’re good at talking about. But chase that, and you’re talking to yourself.

The magic is finding the spot where your audience’s interests and yours intersect.

During a recent workshop, a woman asked me, “I’m a photographer, and the people who like to work with me are outdoorsy — so are you saying I should create a blog post on hikes in the area?”

No.

Don’t do that.

There are a lot of websites out there that are way more invested in writing about hikes than you, and chances are they have more authority in that topic.

My reply to her: “How about creating content around the most photographable hikes in the area? You can create one blog post for Instagram, another for portraits, and even another one for engagement photos!”

The point is not to create content just because people care about X, Y, or Z. Ask yourself what you are best equipped to talk about, and how that intersects with your audience’s interests. The more specific, and more unique to you and your audience, the better.

Keyword research your topics

Once you know your sweet spot, think about general topics and plug those into a doc or spreadsheet. Then pull those ideas into your favorite keyword research tool. I generally start with a list that has one root word, and export out different keyword ideas using a few tools. As I get more ideas, I plug those in, export, and build a small but healthy list to work with.

There are a couple of tools worth investing in to get this information (and some free options, too). Because I believe in a simplified approach to tools, I recommend:

  • A keyword research tool like Moz, SEMrush, or Keywordtool.io
  • A content research tool like Answer the Public, or Buzzsumo
  • A bonus tool like Ubersuggest or good old “People Also Ask”

Rank your bounty by monthly search volume, keyword difficulty, and social interest. Then, cherry pick the topics you want to tackle for the quarter.

Don’t be disheartened if your key terms are competitive. It’s the 2020s — anything worth anything is competitive. The goal is to start creating content that will pay off over time, while you grow your domain authority.

Word of caution: the topics you pick should be in your sweet spot and help your readers live their best life.

Brainstorm, categorize, and prioritize

Once you’ve defined the themes that can anchor your content efforts, use these four categories to help you pick topics within those areas. I like to think of this approach as a pyramid where you cover all the obvious “duh” questions before moving on to the sexy stuff.

Think about topics that would apply in each of these four sections, starting with the largest, general foundation category.

  • Evergreen content relates directly to the product or industry. These are the questions people ask day in and day out. At face value, the keywords may seem like small fish — i.e., they only get 800 to 1K monthly searches. But if they are aligned with your topic, then you very much want to answer these questions. If you don’t, someone else will. Ultimately, the goal of content is to bring in website visitors who are researching your product or service.
  • Original research answers a question or provides insight for an area closely tied to what you do. It’s premium content (long form blog posts, supporting guest posts) that takes more resources to create than a typical blog post, but helps build domain authority. This content hopefully helps you get links from reputable sources and is also fun to work in.
  • Trends and timely content are blog posts that aim to generate buzz, capture attention, and may aid in link building, but tend to be short-lived. These are topics that are in your sweet spot and hot right now. Jump on these seasonally.
  • Lifestyle content is blog content on topics that relate to company values and will connect with readers. Yes, it’s nice to show the human side of your business, because people buy from people they like. But I’d rather have a post that answers my questions over a post showing me cute dog photos, you?

What might seem like basic info to you might be a totally new revelation to your potential audience.

I’ve built a blog to attract over 100K monthly visitors, and one thing I learned was that the content that brought us traffic month after month was the basic stuff. The simple, how do I figure out ______ stuff.

And chances are your blog (or website for that matter) lacks this “beginning of the buyer’s journey” content. If you think everybody knows this stuff, they don’t. You’re probably too close to it — I’ve been there, too.

Questions you can ask yourself to get going:

  • What are some common questions that your audience asks? What are the solutions you can give them?
  • How would you explain this concept to your grandma, or a kid?
  • What is a cool trend with __________ that is worth investing in?
  • What do you wish your best customers knew about __________?

Sources of information you can also look at:

  • Trade pubs (for ideas that can be repurposed for the general audience)
  • Events (for ideas that can be super timely and relevant to a select audience)
  • Influencers in your space (for ideas on what your audience gravitates to)

Execution

Ideally you’ll have a mix of topics on the pyramid to choose from, each quarter. Schedule those. I’ve used Google Sheets, or Trello. The cool kids use Airtable — whatever floats your boat and helps you get your content out.

Eyes on the prize

Blog traffic growth should pick up speed over time. If you build your content accordingly, it will. Determine the point where your interests and your audience interests intersect. Find topics that cater to that sweet spot by answering common FAQs. Add original research seasonally, and sprinkle in some trends and lifestyle content.

When you create blog topics that are more in line with your brand and your strengths, and that match what your audience is looking for, you are much more likely to stand out in a crowded space. The internet is hella crowded — to differentiate and appeal to customers, you need to “do you” best.


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