How Your Brand Can Earn Media Coverage on NBC News, USA Today, CNBC, and More

As you might imagine, it’s not easy to get your brand name mentioned in top media outlets.

But if you put in the work to engage in content marketing + digital PR, the benefits are massive:

  • High-quality backlinks to your site
  • A significant boost in brand awareness
  • An increase in your brand’s authority
  • Improved relationships with writers who loved your content

I’ll explain how you can earn this type of coverage and its corresponding benefits for your brand.

Step 1: Create newsworthy content

You probably have an instinctual sense of what qualifies as news, but some of the key newsworthy elements are timeliness, proximity, and significance.

Timeliness is tough. Hard news is usually covered by media outlets automatically anyway. However, there’s a way to create news — and it’s through data journalism.

By doing your own research, conducting your own studies, running your own surveys, and performing your own analyses, you’re effectively creating news by offering brand new stories.

For example, for our client Porch, we used data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American FactFinder, Yelp, and Zillow to determine which cities are the best for young families.

This project is inherently location-based, which adds the proximity element as well. But even if your content isn’t location-based, explore whether you can take your data and localize it so that you cover multiple geographic areas. (Then, you can pitch local news in addition to national news!)

Significance is also an excellent element to keep in mind, especially during the ideation stage. It basically means: How many people are impacted by this news, and to what degree?

This is especially important if you’re aiming for national news publications, as they tend to have a wide audience. In this case, there are plenty of young families across the country, and CNBC saw that it could connect with this demographic.

When you combine all of these newsworthy elements, you can increase your chances of getting respectable news publications interested.

Step 2: Design and package the content for clarity

You need to present your data in a clear and compelling way. Easier said than done, though, right?

Here are common design pitfalls to watch out for:

  • Over-designing. Instead, experiment with simplistic styles that match your branding and take more creative liberties with headers and where the data naturally lends itself to imagery.
  • Over-branding. If you have your logo on all of the images, it might be a bit too much branding for some publishers. However, if you have a really authoritative brand, it can add authority to the content, too. Test both versions to see what works best for you.
  • Over-labeling. Include all of the text and labels you need to make things clear, but don’t have too much repetition. The more there is to read, the more time it’ll take to understand what’s happening on the graph.

Finally, don’t be afraid to add the most interesting insights or context as callouts to the images. That way people can identify the most pertinent information immediately while still having more to explore if they want the full story.

Take, for example, one of the graphics we created for BestVPN for a project that got coverage on The Motley Fool, USA Today, Nasdaq and more. We don’t assume people will read text in an article to get relevant information, so we put it right on the image.

Here’s another example of a project image we created for Influence.co.

We included the callout at the bottom of the image and featured it in our pitch emails (more on that later) because we knew it was a compelling data point. Lo and behold, it became the headline for the Bustle coverage we secured.

Note: It’s entirely possible a news publication won’t run your images. That’s totally fine! Creating the images is still worth it, because they help everyone grasp your project more quickly (including writers), and when well done, they convey a sense of authority.

When you have all of your data visualized, we recommended creating a write-up that goes along with it. One objective of the article is to explain why you executed the project in the first place. What were you trying to discover? How is this information useful to your audience?

The other objective is to provide more color to the data. What are the implications of your findings? What could it mean to readers, and how can they apply the new knowledge to their lives, if applicable?

Include quotes from experts when appropriate, as this will be useful to publication writers as well.

Step 3: Write personalized pitches

I could create an entirely separate article about how to properly pitch top-tier publishers. But for our purposes, I do want to address two of the most important elements:

Treat writers like people

“You did something PR people never do — but should. Looked at my Twitter feed and made it personal. Nicely done!” — CNBC writer

Building real connections with people takes time and effort. If you’re going to pitch a writer, you need to do the following:

  • Read their past work and fully understand their beat
  • Understand how your work matches their beat
  • Check out their social profiles to learn more about them as people

Some still swear by the templated approach. While it might work sometimes, we’ve found that because writers’ inboxes continue to be inundated with pitches, reaching out to them in a more personalized manner can not only increase our chances of getting emails opened, but also getting a genuinely appreciative response.

So, start your email with a personal connection. Reach out about something you have in common or something about them you admire. It will go a long way!

Include a list of the most relevant insights

“Wow these findings are super interesting and surprising. I will for sure include if I go ahead with this piece.” — The Wall Street Journal writer

Never assume a writer is going to click through to your project and read the entire thing before deciding if they want to cover it. In the pitch email, you need to spell out exactly what you think is the most interesting part about the project for their readers.

The key word being their readers. Sure, overall you probably have a few main takeaways in mind that are compelling, but there’s often nuance in which specific takeaways will be the most relevant to particular publishers.

We’ve seen this so many times, and it’s reflected in the resulting headlines. For example, for a project we created called Generational Knowledge Gaps, we surveyed nearly 1,000 people about their proficiency in hands-on tasks. Look at the news headlines on REALTOR Magazine and ZDNet, respectively:

While REALTOR Magazine went with a headline that captures the general spirit of the project, ZDNet’s is more honed in on what matters for their readers: the tech side of things. If we’d pitched to them the same way we’d pitched to REALTOR, they might not have covered the project at all.

So, after a personalization, include bullet points that say what the key data points are for their particular audience, wrap up the email with a question of whether they’re interested, and send it off.

Conclusion

It’s not an easy process to get the attention of top writers. You have to take time to develop high-quality content — it takes us at least a month — and then strategically promote it, which can also take at least another month to get as much coverage as you can. However, this investment can have major payoff, as you’ll be earning unparalleled brand awareness and high-value backlinks.


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B2B Marketing Subject Matter Experts & Industry Influencers: Which Should I Choose?

Four businesspeople holding question mark signs over their faces image.

Four businesspeople holding question mark signs over their faces image.

What does being an influencer really mean in the B2B world?

The classic B2C influencer is someone with a big following on social media, someone who makes a living doing makeup tutorials or cosplay or skateboarding tricks. Brands who want to reach their audience can simply provide free products or sponsor a post — it’s inherently transactional.

But for B2B, the question is a little trickier. B2B influencers are very rarely celebrities with millions of followers. For example, given enough time and money, you could get Taylor Swift to endorse your hybrid cloud solution. But would her endorsement really persuade your audience?

You can’t judge influence in B2B by follower counts alone. There are multiple ways that people can be influential in the B2B space. Which type of influencer your project needs will vary depending on your goals.

Let’s take a look at two different types of B2B influencer: The Subject Matter Expert and the Industry Influencer.

Subject Matter Experts Vs. Industry Influencers for B2B Marketing

Which is better for your project: A thousand impressions or a single multi-million-dollar click? There’s no right answer for every situation, of course, and the answer may very well be “both.” But the point is to ask the question when your project is in the planning stages.

We can start by defining each of these influencer types, and then we can dig into how to choose the right influencers for your content.

Who Is a Subject Matter Expert?

A subject matter expert (SME) could mean anyone who knows a lot about one particular subject. In influencer marketing, though, it means something slightly different: It’s someone who has that knowledge, and may be influential in business circles, but also has a small social media footprint.

SMEs can include practitioners in a particular field, executives of successful businesses in your target industry, or even your own employees. They may not have the reach of an industry influencer, but they do have knowledge that your target audience will find valuable. What’s more, they’re a credible source, because they’re right down in the trenches with your audience.

The challenge of working with an SME for creating content is that they may not be used to speaking to an audience. While an industry influencer can whip up a 500-word blog post in their sleep, an SME will take more time and encouragement before they’re ready to contribute.

If your goal is to maximize awareness with top-of-funnel content, you wouldn’t go with SMEs exclusively. For content further down the funnel, with a highly-targeted audience, however, the more SME content, the better.

Who Is an Industry Influencer?

Let me say, first, that an industry influencer is no less knowledgeable than an SME. But the work of an industry influencer includes building an audience and actively pursuing thought leadership status. They’re keynote speakers, authors, and podcast hosts. They are more likely to be analysts and consultants than active practitioners.

There are several advantages to working with industry influencers, beyond the obvious broader reach: They already know how to quickly create content and package it for their audience. They know the value of self-promotion and can see when it’s mutually beneficial to create content with your brand. And they can have a broader perspective of the industry, gleaned from analyzing trends and/or consulting with multiple businesses.

Industry influencers are perfect for top and middle-funnel content. But they are less likely to get into the specifics of day-to-day operations, while an SME would be equipped to give those practical details that make lower-funnel content work.

What Type of Influence Does Your B2B Marketing Need?

Which influencer is right for you? As I said, you might want more SMEs in a lower-funnel piece and more industry influencers in top-of-funnel content. But really, the answer is that a healthy mix of influencers tends to get the best results.

Industry influencers bring reach, polish and thought leadership. SMEs bring a practitioner’s experience and credibility. The two can complement each other to make your content irresistible to your audience.

For example, our client monday.com created content with SMEs and industry influencers for their remote work campaign. By combining the strengths of different types of influence, the campaign achieved 1,790% of its projected goal for social reach.

Create an Influencer Community

Here’s one more way that B2B influencer marketing is different from B2C. While B2C agreements tend to be one-off and transactional, B2B influence is about building relationships and forming a community. Instead of contracting with an influencer for a single project, it’s important to keep in contact. Make sure your influencers know each other and facilitate conversations. Help them network, teach, and learn from each other.

When you take an always-on approach to influencer marketing, you can create a trusted group of go-to experts, folks who are loyal to your brand and ready to collaborate on an ongoing basis.

And that’s far more valuable than a Taylor Swift retweet.

What’s working, what isn’t, and what’s next for B2B influencer marketing? Find out what your peers had to say in our 2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing report.

The post B2B Marketing Subject Matter Experts & Industry Influencers: Which Should I Choose? appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.


Source: SEO blog

B2B Marketing Subject Matter Experts & Industry Influencers: Which Should I Choose?

Four businesspeople holding question mark signs over their faces image.

What does being an influencer really mean in the B2B world?

The classic B2C influencer is someone with a big following on social media, someone who makes a living doing makeup tutorials or cosplay or skateboarding tricks. Brands who want to reach their audience can simply provide free products or sponsor a post — it’s inherently transactional.

But for B2B, the question is a little trickier. B2B influencers are very rarely celebrities with millions of followers. For example, given enough time and money, you could get Taylor Swift to endorse your hybrid cloud solution. But would her endorsement really persuade your audience?

You can’t judge influence in B2B by follower counts alone. There are multiple ways that people can be influential in the B2B space. Which type of influencer your project needs will vary depending on your goals.

Let’s take a look at two different types of B2B influencer: The Subject Matter Expert and the Industry Influencer.

Subject Matter Experts Vs. Industry Influencers for B2B Marketing

Which is better for your project: A thousand impressions or a single multi-million-dollar click? There’s no right answer for every situation, of course, and the answer may very well be “both.” But the point is to ask the question when your project is in the planning stages.

We can start by defining each of these influencer types, and then we can dig into how to choose the right influencers for your content.

Who Is a Subject Matter Expert?

A subject matter expert (SME) could mean anyone who knows a lot about one particular subject. In influencer marketing, though, it means something slightly different: It’s someone who has that knowledge, and may be influential in business circles, but also has a small social media footprint.

SMEs can include practitioners in a particular field, executives of successful businesses in your target industry, or even your own employees. They may not have the reach of an industry influencer, but they do have knowledge that your target audience will find valuable. What’s more, they’re a credible source, because they’re right down in the trenches with your audience.

The challenge of working with an SME for creating content is that they may not be used to speaking to an audience. While an industry influencer can whip up a 500-word blog post in their sleep, an SME will take more time and encouragement before they’re ready to contribute.

If your goal is to maximize awareness with top-of-funnel content, you wouldn’t go with SMEs exclusively. For content further down the funnel, with a highly-targeted audience, however, the more SME content, the better.

Who Is an Industry Influencer?

Let me say, first, that an industry influencer is no less knowledgeable than an SME. But the work of an industry influencer includes building an audience and actively pursuing thought leadership status. They’re keynote speakers, authors, and podcast hosts. They are more likely to be analysts and consultants than active practitioners.

There are several advantages to working with industry influencers, beyond the obvious broader reach: They already know how to quickly create content and package it for their audience. They know the value of self-promotion and can see when it’s mutually beneficial to create content with your brand. And they can have a broader perspective of the industry, gleaned from analyzing trends and/or consulting with multiple businesses.

Industry influencers are perfect for top and middle-funnel content. But they are less likely to get into the specifics of day-to-day operations, while an SME would be equipped to give those practical details that make lower-funnel content work.

What Type of Influence Does Your B2B Marketing Need?

Which influencer is right for you? As I said, you might want more SMEs in a lower-funnel piece and more industry influencers in top-of-funnel content. But really, the answer is that a healthy mix of influencers tends to get the best results.

Industry influencers bring reach, polish and thought leadership. SMEs bring a practitioner’s experience and credibility. The two can complement each other to make your content irresistible to your audience.

For example, our client monday.com created content with SMEs and industry influencers for their remote work campaign. By combining the strengths of different types of influence, the campaign achieved 1,790% of its projected goal for social reach.

Create an Influencer Community

Here’s one more way that B2B influencer marketing is different from B2C. While B2C agreements tend to be one-off and transactional, B2B influence is about building relationships and forming a community. Instead of contracting with an influencer for a single project, it’s important to keep in contact. Make sure your influencers know each other and facilitate conversations. Help them network, teach, and learn from each other.

When you take an always-on approach to influencer marketing, you can create a trusted group of go-to experts, folks who are loyal to your brand and ready to collaborate on an ongoing basis.

And that’s far more valuable than a Taylor Swift retweet.

What’s working, what isn’t, and what’s next for B2B influencer marketing? Find out what your peers had to say in our 2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing report.

Page Authority 2.0 Is Coming This Month: What’s Changing and Why

Hey folks,

I’m Russ Jones, Adjunct Search Scientist with Moz, and I’m proud to announce that this month we’ll be releasing a terrific update to our metric, Page Authority (PA).

Although Page Authority hasn’t attracted the same attention as its sibling metric Domain Authority, PA has always correlated with SERPs much better than DA, serving as a strong predictor of ranking. While PA has always fluctuated with changes in the link graph, we’re introducing a whole new method of deriving the score.

Learn More About Page Authority 2.0

What’s changing

Long gone are the days of just counting backlinks a couple of ways and hoping they correlate well with SERPs. As Moz tends to do, we’re pioneering a new manner of calculating Page Authority to produce superior results. Here are some of the ways we’re changing things up:

The training set

In the past, we used SERPs alone to train the Page Authority model. While this method was simple and direct, it left much to be desired. Our first step in addressing the new Page Authority is redefining the training set altogether.

Instead of modeling Page Authority based on one page’s ability to outrank another page, we now train based on the cumulative value of a page based on a number of metrics including search traffic and CPC. While this is a bit of an oversimplification of what’s going on, this methodology allows us to better compare pages that don’t appear in the SERPs together.

For example, imagine Page A is on one topic and Page B is on another topic. Historically, our model wouldn’t get to compare these two pages because they never appear on the same SERP. This new methodology provides an abstract value to each page, such that they can be compared with any other page by the machine-learned model.

The re-training set

One of the biggest problems in building metrics is not what the models see, but what the models don’t see.

Think about this for a minute: what types of URLs don’t show up in the SERPs that the model will use to produce Page Authority? Well, for starters, there won’t be many images or other binary files. There also won’t be penalized pages. In order to address this problem, we now use a common solution of running the model, identifying outliers (high PA URLs which do not in fact have any search value), and then feeding those URLs back into the training set. We can then re-run the model such that it learns from its own mistakes. This can be repeated as many times as is necessary to reduce the number of outliers.

Ripping off the Band-Aid

Moz is always cognizant of the impact the changes to our metrics might have on our customers. There is a trade-off between continuity and accuracy. With Page Authority, we’re focusing on accuracy. This may cause larger-than-normal shifts in your Page Authority, so it’s more important than ever to think about Page Authority with respect to your competitors, not as a standalone number.

What actions should we take?

Communicate with stakeholders, team members, and clients about the update

Just like our upgrade to Domain Authority, some users will likely be surprised by changes in their PA. Make sure they understand that the new PA will be more accurate (and more useful!) and that the most important measurement is relative to their competitors. We won’t release a Page Authority which isn’t better than the previous version, so even if the results are disappointing, understand that you now have better insight than ever before into the performance of your pages in the SERPs.

Use PA as a relative metric, like DA

Page Authority is intrinsically comparative. A PA of 70 means nothing unless you know the PA of your competitors. It could be high enough to allow you to rank for every keyword you like, or it could be terribly low because your competitors are Wikipedia and Quora. The first thing you should do when analyzing the Page Authority of any URL is set it in the proper context of its competitor’s URLs.

Expect PA to keep pace with Google

Just as we announced with Domain Authority, we’re not going to launch the new PA and just let it go. Our intent is to continue to improve upon the model as we discover new and better features and models. This volatility will mostly affect pages with unnatural link profiles, but we would rather stay up-to-date with Google’s algorithms even if it means a bit of a bumpy ride.

When is it launching?

We’ll be rolling out the new Page Authority on September 30, 2020. Between now and then, we encourage you to explore our resources to help you prepare and facilitate conversations with clients and team members. Following the launch of the new PA, I’ll also be hosting a webinar on October 15 to discuss how to leverage the metric. We’re so excited about the new and improved PA and hope you’re looking forward to this update too.

If you have any questions, please comment below, reach out to me on Twitter @rjonesx, or email me at russ@moz.com.

To get prepared and learn more about the upcoming change to Page Authority, be sure to dig into our helpful resources:

Visit the PA Resource Center

5 Case Studies on How to Optimize B2B Influencer Engagement on LinkedIn

LinkedIn Influencer Engagement

LinkedIn Influencer Engagement

With over 700 million community members in 200+ countries and territories, LinkedIn is without question the place for businesses to do business. With 91% of marketing executives using LinkedIn as a content source (SocialPilot) it’s easy to understand why 94% of B2B marketers using LinkedIn to distribute content (CMI). In fact, there’s been a 50% year over year increase in content shared on the LinkedIn platform (LinkedIn).

With many social network options, LinkedIn has proven to be an effective choice for B2B marketers. A study from HubSpot showed that traffic from LinkedIn generates the highest visitor to lead conversion rate, 277% higher than Facebook and Twitter.

While there are robust opportunities to connect with potential customers on LinkedIn, the platform is busier than ever, making it hard to stand out. There are also challenges in terms of reduced organic visibility and the trend towards distrust of sales outreach and what brands publish directly. With so much information, many buyers are suffering what I call Content Attention Deficit.

One of the most promising growth areas within the B2B marketing mix is working with influencers. In our research we found that 77% of marketers say their prospective customers rely on advice from industry experts. and 96% of marketers that engage influencers consider their program to be successful.

Trusted experts that have the attention of customers can help B2B brands attract and engage potential customers in more meaningful ways. But what are the best ways to engage with B2B influencers on LinkedIn? How are B2B brands successfully working with influencers to achieve marketing goals using the LinkedIn platform?

To help B2B marketers think about how they can better engage with influencers on LinkedIn, here are several examples of how TopRank Marketing and a few clients are doing just that:

1. Give the Gift of Recognition to Influencers

Give Gift Recognition Influencers
For small B2B brands and those of any size that do not have relationships with influencers, a good starting point to warm up the influencer community is to recognize them. When you come to a party bearing gifts, it makes an impression and with influencers, it’s no different except instead of a bottle of spirits, you’re giving the gift of recognition.

For our 2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing Research Report, we followed our own best practices and identified 20 top B2B influencer marketing professionals working for B2B brands and published a list in the report and as a blog post. Sharing that list on LinkedIn while tagging each person along with a small infographic featuring the group provided relevant and credible recognition. The result was tens of thousands of views on LinkedIn, hundreds of reactions and over 50 comments. More importantly, the post helped generate goodwill among those mentioned, inspiring new connections, conversations and engagement opportunities.

2. Grow Credible Awareness of a Brand Solution

Build Credible Awareness with Influencers

Mitel wanted to create awareness, credibility and consideration of their Remote Working Solutions and what better way to do that than by engaging remote work experts in conversations around topics that highlight the issues and solutions so many companies are considering in today’s new normal. A variety of remote work influencers and content formats were used to accomplish program awareness including a livestream video broadcast on LinkedIn. To showcase the topic of remote work with credibility, several paid influencers were engaged to share their expertise along with a Mitel executive on a LinkedIn Live. With an audience of professionals, Linkedin was the perfect place to highlight remote work conversation and in a format that is increasingly important for B2B engagement  – live video.

While there were multiple influencers and content formats involved with this program, the LivesStream on LinkedIn had the highest engagement of all, helping Mitel achieve meaningful their awareness, credibility and consideration goals.

3. Increase Brand Engagement with Authentic Stories

Stories Influencer Engagement

While LinkedIn is the most relevant platform for reaching business decision makers, reaching and connecting with both marketers and sales professionals has become increasingly difficult due to  information overload. LinkedIn also faced this challenge, even on their own platform. 

In order to reach business decision makers in a meaningful way, LinkedIn Marketing and Sales Solutions set out to create a social influencer content campaign characterized by:

  • Increasing engagement and help humanize LinkedIn as a brand by partnering with well respected industry experts to share real-life struggles, stories and obstacles with a focused audience. 
  • Driving new audiences to targeted Showcase Pages via the influencer’s audiences (that were not already following or engaging with the LinkedIn brand).
  • Continuing to nurture and grow relationships with sales and marketing influencers as part of an ongoing influencer program.
  • Engaging the audience in-channel on the LinkedIn platform (versus sending to alternate content elsewhere).

Since much of B2B marketing is more mechanical than meaningful, LinkedIn decided to forego marketing and sales tips content and emphasize stories from respected influencers about experiences they’ve had in their careers. Influencers were asked to share:

  • A defining moment in your career and how it shaped you as a marketer or sales professional.
  • One thing NOT on your LinkedIn profile that people should about you?
  • One rising star in your field that you’d like to recognize? What makes them amazing? 

By making the shift to a combination of professional and personal content, we were able to better engage the audience around their own professional opportunities and provide them a platform to engage directly with people that they respect. 

With the goal to drive authentic engagement, on platform, between LinkedIn and their customers, the reach from influencers’ brand mentions exceeded 54 million and there was a 1,000% increase in post engagements over the previous 12 months. This tactic was also part of an ongoing influencer marketing program that won the ANA B2 Marketing Award. 

While it would be expected that LinkedIn working with a top B2B influencer marketing agency like TopRank Marketing and a premium group of influencers would achieve results like these, the overall story about the opportunity with B2B influencer marketing is a bit different. The State of B2B Influencer Marketing Research Report found that while 12X more marketers who run ongoing influencer engagement efforts are very successful compared to those who run periodic campaigns, only 19% of B2B marketers are running ongoing influencer programs.

4. Improve Reach of a Brand Webinar

LinkedIn Carousel Promotion
Prophix software was looking for more more interesting ways to get the attention of LinkedIn followers of the brand to help promote an upcoming brand webinar about the 2020 CFO Benchmark Report. Since the amount of content being published on LinkedIn has risen 50% year over year, the competition for organic attention has too. Fortunately, LinkedIn offers an opportunity for members or brands to upload vertical PDF files to create a carousel of messages that can tell a story or communicate a series of connected messages very different than what the normal feed can.

For the webinar in question, a key financial industry influencer, Jack McCullough of the CFO Leadership Council was engaged to collaborate on the report highlighted in the webinar and was also featured in the carousel promotion. The same 3rd party credibility effect that helped the report and webinar also provided validation to the LinkedIn post which had over 1,500 organic impressions and referred nearly 200 visitors to the registration page.

5. Connect Brand Executive with Influencers

Brand Executives and Influencers
Research has show that B2B buyers favorably view brands with senior executives that engage on social media. In an effort to connect with customers while also creating relationships with respected industry influencers, the CEO of HRS engages in content creation and sharing on social networks like LinkedIn. In this example, Tobias Ragge posted an article on his LinkedIn profile page featuring a group of travel and tech industry influencers to provide them with recognition in the context of topics important to the HRS brand and customers.

By featuring relevant industry influencers in content from the CEO of the company, HRS was able to inspire meaningful engagement and goodwill with these respected voices as well as to build influence for the CEO as well.

Before you get started with B2B influencer engagement on LinkedIn, it’s essential that you have a documented influencer marketing strategy. For the most successful B2B influencer marketers, our research found that having a documented strategy (68%) is one of the key differentiators over less successful marketers (25%) so it’s a very important step. Here are some basic questions to get you thinking about developing your own B2B influencer marketing plan:

  • Topic – What topic do you want to be influential about?
  • Influencers – Identify, and qualify relevant influencers
  • Collect – Activate influencers for a project or program
  • Co-Create – Collaborate on content: text, audio, video, interactive, live
  • Publish – Will content live on LinkedIn, off or both?
  • Promote – Promote via brand LinkedIn page, influencers, ads
  • Optimize – Monitor tracking URLs, LinkedIn engagement, adjust

Of course if you are looking for assistance in understanding what role influencer marketing can play in your B2B marketing mix, be sure to reach out.

The post 5 Case Studies on How to Optimize B2B Influencer Engagement on LinkedIn appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.


Source: SEO blog

Title Tags SEO: When to Include Your Brand and/or Boilerplate

If your websites are like most, they include a fair amount of extra “stuff” in the title tags: things like your brand name or repeating boilerplate text that appears across multiple pages.

Should you include these elements in your titles automatically?

To be fair, most sites do.

Alternatively, could it help your SEO to actually include less information in your titles? (Or at least in specific circumstances?)

We know from a handful of studies that titles of a certain length tend to perform better. A now-famous study from the engineers at Etsy showed how shorter titles performed better than longer ones. SEOs speculate that this could be because shorter titles can have more focused relevancy (by focusing on core keywords), might earn higher click-through rates, or some other reason we can’t imagine.

When choosing which part of a title to shorten, brand names and boilerplate text are obvious choices. But how do you determine if this is something you should consider for your own SEO?

Here’s an example of a brand’s site name at the end of every title:

We’ve all seen sites like this. Heck, most of us do this on our own sites. The question is, does having our brand/site name at the end of every title actually help, or hurt?

But first, we also have to consider other types of boilerplate.

What is boilerplate? Boilerplate simply means standardized, non-unique pieces of text that are used over and over again. This often includes things like categories, product categories, author tags, and taglines.

In this example below, the boilerplate text on every title includes “Tomatoes – Vegetable Seeds – Shop.”

Sometimes boilerplate material can become quite long. The comic book review site Major Spoilers (awesome name!) often includes the same 65-character boilerplate on many pages:

“Major Spoilers – Comic Book Reviews, News, Previews, and Podcasts”

Of course, at this length, it’s so long that Google truncates every single title:

The problems that boilerplate can cause your SEO are threefold:

  1. Relevancy: Unnecessary words can make your title less relevant, both to search engines and users. For search engines, this could mean lower rankings. For users, this could result in fewer clicks.
  2. Uniqueness: Titles that share the same repeating text, and only vary from one another by a word or two, aren’t very unique. While this isn’t necessarily a problem, it goes against most SEO best practices, where uniqueness is key.
  3. Length: Boilerplate means you have less room to display other words in your title, and Google will often cut these off if they go beyond a certain length.

Experiment #1: Remove category from title

We decided to run a couple of boilerplate experiments here at Moz, to see if we could increase our rankings and traffic by removing some of the repeating parts of our titles.

We started with our Whiteboard Friday blog posts. Every time Moz publishes a new Whiteboard Friday, we traditionally include “Whiteboard Friday” in the title.

What would happen if we removed this from the titles?

Using an A/B split test methodology — where we rolled the test out on 50% of the titles and used the other 50% as a control — we saw an amazing 20% uplift from this experiment.

This chart represents the cumulative impact of the test on organic traffic. The central blue line is the best estimate of how the variant pages, with the change applied, performed compared to how we would have expected without any changes applied. The blue shaded region represents our 95% confidence interval: there is a 95% probability that the actual outcome is somewhere in this region. If this region is wholly above or below the horizontal axis, that represents a statistically significant test.

Honestly, the results surprised us. Whiteboard Friday is a popular brand (so we thought) but removing this boilerplate from our titles produced a significant uplift in traffic to those pages.

At this point, we got cocky…

Experiment #2: Remove brand from title

If removing the category name from Whiteboard Friday posts produced such a significant uplift, what if we removed our brand name from all titles?

For this A/B experiment, we did exactly that—removing the word “Moz” from 50% of our titles and measuring the results.

Crazy, right? If it worked by removing “Whiteboard Friday” would we see the same uplift by removing “Moz?”

Sadly, Google had other plans:

While this A/B test never reached full statistical significance, we actually saw a 4% decline in traffic by removing our brand from our title tags.

Boo!

So why did this test not produce the same gains? To be honest, I’ve removed the brand name from other site’s titles and seen as much as a 20% uplift.

It turns out that whether or not removing brand/boilerplate will be beneficial to your SEO depends on a few key factors, which you can gauge in advance.

How to know if removing boilerplate may succeed

Over 10 years of experience and literally millions of title tags, I’ve found that there are basically four factors that influence whether or not removing boilerplate from your titles might be beneficial:

  1. Brand Strength: Popular brand names in titles almost always perform better than unknown brands, even when people aren’t searching for your brand specifically. Amazon’s brand recognition, for example, likely gives a significant boost to including “Amazon” in every title, even when people aren’t specifically searching Amazon. Less recognizable brands, however, don’t always get the same boost, and can actually lead to fewer visits based on relevancy, length, and clickability (described next.)
  2. Relevancy: Are your boilerplate/brand keywords relevant to what your users search for? For example, if you’re site is about television repair, then boilerplate titles that say “Brad’s TV Repair” are going to be much more relevant than boilerplate that simply say “Brads.” (We’ll explore a way to determine your boilerplate’s brand strength and relevancy in the next section.)
  3. Length: In general, long boilerplate has the potential to do more harm than short boilerplate/brand words. Long boilerplate can dilute the relevance of your titles. So if you include “Buy Brad’s TVs, Television Repair, High Definition Servicing, Audio and Visual Equipment for Sale in Houston Texas and Surrounding Areas” – you may want to rethink your boilerplate.
  4. Clickability: Sometimes, boilerplate can make your titles more clickable, even if they aren’t terribly relevant. Words like “Sale”, “Solved”, “Free”, “2020”, “New”, and many others can lead to an increase in click-through rates (CTR.) Sometimes you can’t tell until you test, but in many cases even adding clickable elements to your boilerplate can lead to significant gains.

Simple technique for determining your brand strength and boilerplate relevancy

This simple technique will also show why removing “Whiteboard Friday” led to an increase in traffic while removing “Moz” from titles did not.

Here’s what you want to do: for each piece of boilerplate, determine the number of URLs on your site that rank/receive traffic for those keywords.

For this, we’ll use Google Search Console.

Simply enter your boilerplate/brand as a query filter (you may need to break it into chunks for longer boilerplate) and see how many URLs receive traffic for queries that include that keyword.

When we filter for keywords that contain our “moz” brand name, we find thousands of ranking URLs.

People are searching for things like:

  • Moz DA Checker
  • Moz Pro
  • Moz SEO
  • Moz Blog
  • Etc., etc.

As our brand name is part of so many queries and leads to visits across thousands of pages, this tells us that “Moz” is a very strong brand, and we’d likely be smart to include it as part of our title tags.

“Moz” is also very short at only 3 characters, which doesn’t hurt either.

So what happens when we try this same technique with “Whiteboard Friday” — the boilerplate that led to a 20% uplift when we removed it? We see a very different result:

In this case, almost all the traffic for “Whiteboard Friday” search terms goes to only one or two pages.

For most Whiteboard Friday posts, the term is simply irrelevant. It’s not what people are searching for, and the brand isn’t strong enough to produce additional uplift.

Also, at 17 characters long, this boilerplate added significant length to each of our titles, in addition to possibly diluting the relevancy for what the posts were ranking for.

Final thoughts + bonus free title tag webinar

These tips can’t tell you definitively whether you should or shouldn’t include boilerplate or brand in your title tags, but they should give you a pretty good idea of when you should test things out.

Remember: Always test and evaluate before making any SEO change permanent. At least know the impact of the change you are making.

Also, please don’t be under the impression that you should always remove boilerplate from your titles. In some instances, actually adding boilerplate can produce an uplift, particularly when the boilerplate is:

  1. Recognizable: For example a strong brand
  2. Relevant: The right keywords
  3. Clickable: Encourages a high CTR
  4. Succinct: Not overly long

If you found value in the tips, and want to learn even more ways to optimize your title tags, we’ve made available a free webinar for you: SEO Master Class: Advanced Title Tag Optimization (For Any Site).

If you’ve got 40 minutes, it’s definitely worth a watch.

Watch Free Webinar

Best of luck with your SEO!

B2B Marketing News: B2B CMOs Plan 2021 Spending Rise, Influencer Marketing’s Pandemic Strength, & YouTube’s Top-Performing Ads

2020 August 28 Pubmatic Chart

2020 August 28 Pubmatic Chart

The Majority of B2B CMOs Expect to Increase Their Spending on A Variety of Digital Channels Next Year
Nearly 69 percent of B2B marketing CMOs will increase digital advertising spending in 2021, including email and mobile marketing, paid search, website ads, organic SEO, and social media marketing, according to recently-released survey data from Gartner of interest to digital marketers. MarketingCharts

US B2B Digital Advertising Thrives amid the Coronavirus as Traditional B2B Spend Plummets
B2B firms will spend over $8 billion on digital advertising in 2020, a 22.6 percent increase from 2019’s total, according to newly-released forecast data, also showing that 43 percent of U.S. B2B marketers said they plan to reallocate live event spending to content creation. eMarketer

Engagement with sponsored influencer posts doubled during lockdowns
Between March and July 2020 sponsored influencer posts saw a five-fold increase in interactions, reaching 57 million in July, according to recently-released report data from Shareablee. Business of Apps

Enterprise CMO Survey: COVID-19’s Impact on Budgets and Tactics
61 percent of enterprise CMOs said they created special customer communication during the pandemic, topping the list of actions taken by large global firms, with 47 percent noting that they deployed customer sentiment tools, while 42 percent developed scenarios for planning purposes, according to recently-released survey data. MarketingProfs

Facebook launches a Shop tab in its app, just like Instagram
Facebook has rolled out a global test of its shopping feature — Facebook Shop — occupying its own new tab in the platform’s app, in a move aligning in-app purchasing features with those already present in its Instagram offering, the social media giant recently announced. The Verge

In-App Bidding Gathers Steam, But Adoption Looks Nothing Like Header Bidding On The Web
More digital advertisers who utilize mobile app ad buys are embracing real-time bidding programmatic-like auctions, according to MoPub, in a shift that could affect how marketers allocate spending. Ad Exchanger

2020 August 28 Statistics Image

Email Falls Behind WhatsApp As Customer Request Channel: Study
Small to medium size global businesses have seen rising use of digital communication channels during the pandemic, with use of WhatsApp rising some 76 percent, SMS text by 56 percent, and traditional email 10 percent, according to recently-released survey data of interest to online marketers. MediaPost

Which YouTube TrueView for Action Direct-Response Ads Are Tops So Far in 2020?
Google’s YouTube platform has released an algorithmic list of its top-performing ads that utilize the video giant’s TrueView for Action automated bidding system, YouTube recently announced. Adweek

U.S. Advertising Falls 14% In July, Most Moderate Rate Of Erosion Since March
The largest advertisers and digital media helped overall U.S. advertising spending tally its best month during July since the effects of the pandemic began, as April’s decrease of 35 percent in ad spending had fallen to 14 percent in July — two of several items of interest to digital marketing in newly-released report data. MediaPost

Mobile ad spend jumps 71% amid pandemic recovery
Spending on mobile advertising soared some 71 percent globally during the second quarter compared to 2019, with rates in the U.S. even higher at 77 percent, and a global increase of 8 percent over first-quarter mobile ad spending, according to recently-released study data. Mobile Marketer

ON THE LIGHTER SIDE:

2020 August 28 Marketoonist Comic

A lighthearted look at “business as usual” by Marketoonist Tom Fishburne — Marketoonist

Wendy’s Spices Up Other Brands’ Twitter Profile Pictures — AdWeek

TOPRANK MARKETING & CLIENTS IN THE NEWS:

  • Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise (ALE) / TopRank Marketing — 2020 Finalists and Winners – Content Marketing Awards — Content Marketing Awards
  • SAP — 3 Actionable Insights with… SAP global CMO Alicia Tillman — The Drum
  • Anne Leuman — What’s Trending: Make B2B Content More Memorable — LinkedIn (client)
  • TopRank Marketing — B2B Marketers Lend Their Support to Influencer Programs — New Horizons

Have you come across your own top marketing stories from the past week of news? Please let us know in the comments below.

Thank you for reading our weekly B2B marketing industry news, and we hope that you’ll return next Friday and tune in for another array of the most relevant B2B and digital marketing industry news. In the meantime, you can follow us at @toprank on Twitter for even more timely daily news.

The post B2B Marketing News: B2B CMOs Plan 2021 Spending Rise, Influencer Marketing’s Pandemic Strength, & YouTube’s Top-Performing Ads appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.


Source: SEO blog

Google Ads Mistakes to Avoid — Best of Whiteboard Friday

Contrary to popular belief, SEO and PPC aren’t at opposite ends of the spectrum. There are plenty of ways the two search disciplines can work together for benefits all around, especially when it comes to optimizing your Google Ads. In this informative Whiteboard Friday episode from last Spring, MozCon speaker and Kick Point President Dana DiTomaso explains how you can harness the power of both SEO and PPC for a better Google experience overall.

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Hey, Moz readers. My name is Dana DiTomaso, and I’m President and partner at Kick Point. We’re a digital marketing agency way up in the frozen wilds of Edmonton, Alberta. Today I’m going be talking to you about PPC, and I know you’re thinking, “This is an SEO blog. What are you doing here talking about PPC?”

But one of my resolutions for 2019 is to bring together SEO and PPC people, because SEO can learn a lot from PPC, and yes, PPC, you also can learn a lot from SEO. I know PPC people are like, “We just do paid. It’s so great.” But trust me, both can work together. In our agency, we do both SEO and PPC, and we work with a lot of companies who have one person, sometimes two and they’re doing everything.

One of the things we try to do is help them run better Ads campaigns. Here I have tips on things that we see all the time, when we start working with a new Ads account, that we end up fixing, and hopefully I can pass this on to you so you can fix it before you have to call an agency to come and fix it for you. One of the things is this is actually a much longer piece than what I can present on this whiteboard. There’s only so much room.

There is actually a blog post on our website, which you can find here. Please check that out and that will have the full nine tips. But I’m just going to break it down to a few today.

1. Too many keywords

First thing, too many keywords. We see this a lot where people, in Google it says make sure to put together keywords that have the same sort of theme.

But your theme can be really specific, or it can be kind of vague. This is an example, a real example that we got, where the keyword examples were all lawyer themes, so “defense lawyer,” “criminal lawyer,””dui lawyer,” “assault lawyer,” “sexual assault lawyer.” Technically, they all have the same theme of “lawyer,”but that’s way too vague for it to be all in one single ad group, because what kind of ad are you going to show?

“We are lawyers. Call us.” It’s not specific enough. Take for example “dui lawyer,”which I know is a really very competitive niche, and then you can do [dui lawyer], [dui lawyer seattle], and then “dui lawyer” and +dui+lawyer+seattle spelled out a little bit differently. I’ll talk about that in a second. By taking this one thing and then breaking it down into a much more specific ad group, you can really have much more control.

This is a consistent theme in all the tips I talk about is much more control over where you’re spending your money, what keywords you’re spending it on, what your ads are, having a much better landing page to ad match, which is also really important. It just makes your ad life so much easier when you’ve got it in all of those ad groups. I know it might seem intimidating. It’s like, “Well, I have three ad groups now.If I follow your tips, I’m going to have 40.”

But at the same time, it’s way easier to manage 40 well organized groups than it is to manage 3 really badly organized groups. Keep that in mind.

2. Picking the right match type

The next thing is picking the right match type. You can see here I’ve got this bracket stuff and this phrase stuff and these plus signs. There are really four match types.

Broad match

There’s broad match, which is terrible and don’t ever use it. Broad match is just you writing out the keyword, and then Google just displays it for whatever it feels like is relevant to that particular search. For example, we’ve seen examples where it’s like a catering company and they’ll have “catering” as a keyword, and they’re showing up for all sorts of phrases in catering where they can’t provide catering, so searching for a venue that only does in-house catering. Or they’re spending money on a catering conference or just totally irrelevant stuff. Do not use broad match.

Broad match modifier (BMM)

The upgrade from that is what’s called broad match modifier or BMM, and that’s where these plus signs come in. This is really the words dui, lawyer, and seattle in any order, but they all have to exist and other things can exist around that. It could be, “I need a DUI lawyer in Seattle.” “I live in Seattle. I need a DUI lawyer.” That would also work for that particular keyword.

Phrase match

The next type is phrase, and that’s in the quotes. This “dui lawyer” is the example here, and then you can have anything before it or you can have anything after it, but you can’t have something in between it. It couldn’t be “dui who is really great at being a lawyer” for example. Weak example, but you get the idea. You can’t just shove stuff in the middle of a phrase match.

Exact match

Then exact match is what’s in the brackets here, and that is just those words and nothing else. If I have [dui lawyer], this keyword, if I didn’t have [dui lawyer seattle], this keyword would not trigger if somebody searches [dui lawyer seattle]. That’s as specific as possible. You really want to try that for your most competitive keywords.

This is the really expensive stuff, because you do not want to waste one single penny on anything that is irrelevant to that particular search. This is your head on, it’s really expensive every click. I’ve got to make sure I’m getting the most money possible for those clicks. That’s where you really want to use exact match.

3. Only one ad per group

Next, tips. The next thing is what we see is a lot of people who have only one ad per group.

Have at least 3 ads per group

This is not a tip. This is a criticism up here. The thing is that maybe, again, you think it’s easy for management, but it’s really hard to see what’s going to work, because if you’re not always testing, how are you going to know if you could do better? Make sure to have at least three ads per group.

Add emotional triggers into your ad copy

Then look at your ad copy. We see a lot of just generic like, “We are the best lawyers. Call us.” There’s nothing there that says I need to call these people. Really think about how you can add those emotional triggers into your copy. Talk to your client or your team, if you work in-house, and find out what are the things that people say when they call. What are the things where they say, “Wow, you really helped me with this” or, “I was feeling like this and then you came in and I just felt so much better.”

That can really help to spice up your ads. We don’t want to get too fancy with this, but we certainly want to make something that’s going to help you stand out. Really add those emotional triggers into your ad copy.

Make sure to have a call to action

Then the next thing is making sure to have a call to action, which seems basic because you think it’s an ad. If you click it, that’s the call to action. But sometimes people on the Internet, they’re not necessarily thinking. You just want to say, “You know what? Just call me or email me or we’re open 24 hours.”

Just be really specific on what you want the person to do when they look at the ad. Just spell it out for them. I know it seems silly. Just tell them. Just tell them what you want them to do. That’s all you need to do.

Use extensions!

Then make sure you add in all of the extensions. In Google Ads, if you’re not super familiar with the platform, there’s a section called Extensions. These are things like when the address shows up under an ad, or you’ve got those little links that come up, or you’ve got somebody saying we’re open 24 hours, for example. There are all sorts of different extensions that you can use. Just put in all the extensions that you possibly can for every single one of your groups.

Then they won’t all trigger all at the same time, but at least they’re there and it’s possible that they could trigger. If they do, that’s give your ad more real estate versus your competition, which is really great on mobile because ads take up a lot of space at the top of a mobile search. You want to make sure to shove your competition as far as you possibly can down that search so you own as much of that property as you possibly can. One thing that I do see people doing incorrectly with extensions, though, is setting extensions at say the campaign level, and then you have different ad groups that cover different themes.

Going back to this example over here, with the different types of lawyers, let’s say you had an extension that talks specifically about DUI law, but then it was triggering on say sexual assault law. You don’t want that to happen. Make sure you have really fine-tuned control over your different extensions so you’re showing the right extension with the right type of keyword and the right type of ad. The other thing that we see a lot is where people have location extensions and they’re showing all the location extensions where they should not be showing all the location extensions.

You’ve got an ad group for, say, Seattle, and it’s talking about this new home development that you have, and because you just loaded in all of your location extensions, suddenly you’re showing extensions for something in say San Francisco. It’s just because you haven’t filtered properly. Really double-check to make sure that you’ve got your filter set up properly for your location extensions and that you’re showing the right location extension for the right ad.

I know that Google says, “We’ll pick the locations closest to the client.” But you don’t know where that person is searching right there. They could be in San Francisco at that moment and searching for new home builds in Seattle, because maybe they’re thinking about moving from San Francisco to Seattle. You don’t want them to see the stuff that’s there. You want them to see the stuff that’s at the place where they’re intending to be. Really make sure you control that.

4. Keep display and search separate

Last, but not least, keep display and search separate.

By default, Google so helpfully says, “We’ll just show your ads everywhere. It’s totally cool. This is what we want everyone to do.” Don’t do that. This is what makes Google money. It does not make you money. The reason why is because display network, which is where you’re going to a website and then you see an ad, and search network, when you type in the stuff and you see an ad, are two totally different beasts.

Avoid showing text ads on the display network for greater campaign control

It’s really a different type of experience. To be honest, if you take your search campaigns, which are text-based ads, and now you’re showing them on websites, you’re showing a boring text ad on a website that already has like 50 blinky things and click here. They’re probably not seeing us and maybe they have an ad blocker installed. But if they are, certainly your text ad, which is kind of boring and not intended for that medium, is not going to be the thing that stands out.

Really you’re just wasting your money because you’ll end up with lower relevancy, less clicks, and then Google thinks that your group is bad. Then you’ll end up paying more because Google thinks your group is bad. It really gives you that extra control by saying, “This is the search campaign. It’s only on search. This is the display campaign. It’s only on display.” Keep the two of them totally separate. Then you have lots of control over the search ads being for search and the display ads being for display.

Don’t mix those two up. Make sure to uncheck that by default. Definitely there are more tips on our blog here. But I hope that this will help you get started. SEOs, if you’ve never done a PPC campaign in your life, I recommend just setting one up. Put 50 bucks behind that thing. Just try it out, because I think what will really help you is understanding more of how people search, because as we get less and less keyword data from the different tools that we use to figure out what the heck are people googling when they try to search for our business, ads give you some of that data back.

That’s where ads can be a really great ally in trying to get better SEO results. I hope you found this enjoyable. Thanks so much.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com


Ready for more?

You’ll uncover even more SEO goodness in the MozCon 2020 video bundle. At this year’s special low price of $129, this is invaluable content you can access again and again throughout the year to inspire and ignite your SEO strategy:

  • 21 full-length videos from some of the brightest minds in digital marketing
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10 Wise Quotes To Inspire Your Influencer Marketing

Two people jumping in the air in front of a beautiful sunset.

Two people jumping in the air in front of a beautiful sunset.

What will successful B2B influencer marketing look like in a post-pandemic world, and what can marketers do today to be ready?

Here are 10 quotes from some of the best in the B2B influencer marketing business to inspire your marketing today and to prepare for the eventual post-pandemic landscape.

1 — Rani Mani of Adobe

Rani Mani

For Rani Mani, head of social influencer enablement at Adobe*, reaching out to uncover the heartfelt motivations, challenges, and aspirations of B2B influencers can be a great way to start building a long-lasting  marketing relationship. She shares additional insight in our recently-released 2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing Research Report.

[bctt tweet=”“I often start my discovery conversations with influencers by finding out what really makes their heart sing — what does success look like to them?” — Rani Mani @ranimani0707″ username=”toprank”]

2 — Ann Handley of MarketingProfs

Ann Handley

Ann Handley, speaker and chief content officer at MarketingProfs see empathy as key to all successful marketing efforts, whether they are of the B2B influencer marketing variety or more traditional approaches. “Start with empathy. Continue with utility. Improve with analysis. Optimize with love,” Ann has wisely suggested — advice that will well-serve marketers looking to embrace gratitude.

[bctt tweet=”“Start with empathy. Continue with utility. Improve with analysis. Optimize with love.” — Ann Handley @MarketingProfs” username=”toprank”]

3 — Amisha Gandhi of SAP Ariba

Amisha Gandhi, vice president of influencer marketing and communications at SAP Ariba* has observed that co-creating content with influencers offers an array of advantages.

Amisha Gandhi of SAP Quote Image

[bctt tweet=”“Working with influencers, to co-create content, delivers value and can inspire audiences to take action.” — Amisha Gandhi @AmishaGandhi” username=”toprank”]

4 — Tom Treanor of Arm Treasure Data

Tom Treanor

For Tom Treanor, global head of marketing at Arm Treasure Data*, B2B influencers make good sense in an array of content areas businesses may already be involved with, as he outlined recently in “How B2B Influencer Marketing Offers Brands an Ideal Alternative to In-Person Events.”

[bctt tweet=”“Consider how you work with influencers in areas such as podcasts, webinars, live-streams, ebooks, blogs and social content. Are there ways that your marketing can be improved with the help of industry influencers?” @RtMixMktg” username=”toprank”]

5 — Ty Heath of LinkedIn

Ty Heath

Ty Heath, global lead of The B2B Institute at LinkedIn*, sees the power of B2B influencer marketing in building ongoing relationships, especially helpful for breaking through the noise in light of rising content attention deficit.

LinkedIn Ty Heath Quote Image

[bctt tweet=”“People can break through the noise. People trust people. Influence is about relationships.” — Ty Heath @tyrona” username=”toprank”]

6 — Lee Odden of TopRank Marketing

Our own CEO and co-founder Lee Odden has been instrumental in the development and growth of the practice of B2B influencer marketing, and has long seen its multiple advantages for not just brands and influencers, but also B2B buyers.

[bctt tweet=”“When planned and implemented effectively, B2B influencer marketing programs build trust and confidence for buyers, influencers and the brand.” — Lee Odden @LeeOdden” username=”toprank”]

7 — Tamara McCleary of Thulium

Tamara McCleary

Tamara McCleary, CEO at Thulium, sees the power of long-term, ongoing marketing efforts — especially when these types of always-on programs are applied to B2B influencer marketing.

[bctt tweet=”“A long-term influencer program will allow your brand to create true brand advocates, powerful brand evangelists, and raving fans.” — Tamara McCleary @TamaraMcCleary” username=”toprank”]

8 — Ashley Zeckman of TopRank Marketing

Ashley Zeckman

Our own senior director of digital strategy Ashley Zeckman sees B2B influencer marketing as a great way to collaborate around ideas, and a more effective alternative than traditional one-way “buy this” approaches.

[bctt tweet=”Rather than unapologetically telling us to buy a product, #B2B influencers are collaborating around an idea. – @azeckman #InfluencerMarketing” username=”toprank”]

9 — Konstanze Alex of Cisco Systems

Konstanze Alex

For Konstanze Alex, head of global digital storytelling at Cisco Systems, trust and relationship-building are key when it comes to working with B2B influencers.

[bctt tweet=”“Regardless of which team at a brand engages with influencers, relationship and trust building should be a top priority” — Konstanze Alex @Konstanze” username=”toprank”]

10 —Joshua Nite of TopRank Marketing

Joshua Nite

Our own content marketing manager Joshua Nite recently shared his insight on how B2B marketers can best work with influencers during the global health crisis, and in “How to Nurture B2B Influencer Relationships During the Pandemic” he offered a smart take on the similarities between influencers and friendships.

[bctt tweet=”“Influence relationships operate by much the same rules as any friendship: Get to know the person, don’t talk about yourself too much, give something before you ask for anything, and be sensitive to their emotions and needs.” @NiteWrites” username=”toprank”]

Walk Your B2B Influencer Marketing Walk

via GIPHY

Using the wise advice we’ve highlighted here from Rani, Ann, Amisha, Tom, Ty, Lee, Tamara, Konstanze, Ashley, and Joshua, you can walk your B2B influencer marketing walk with efforts that will take you on down the line to new heights in 2021 and beyond.

Whether you work with a top B2B influencer marketing agency such as TopRank Marketing or utilize your own team, now is an ideal time to reach B2B influencers and work together to drive digital brand conversations.

* Adobe, SAP Ariba, Arm Treasure Data, and LinkedIn are TopRank Marketing clients.

The post 10 Wise Quotes To Inspire Your Influencer Marketing appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.


Source: SEO blog

10 Wise Quotes To Inspire Your Influencer Marketing

Two people jumping in the air in front of a beautiful sunset.

What will successful B2B influencer marketing look like in a post-pandemic world, and what can marketers do today to be ready?

Here are 10 quotes from some of the best in the B2B influencer marketing business to inspire your marketing today and to prepare for the eventual post-pandemic landscape.

1 — Rani Mani of Adobe

Rani Mani

For Rani Mani, head of social influencer enablement at Adobe*, reaching out to uncover the heartfelt motivations, challenges, and aspirations of B2B influencers can be a great way to start building a long-lasting  marketing relationship. She shares additional insight in our recently-released 2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing Research Report.

“I often start my discovery conversations with influencers by finding out what really makes their heart sing — what does success look like to them?” — Rani Mani @ranimani0707 Click To Tweet

2 — Ann Handley of MarketingProfs

Ann Handley

Ann Handley, speaker and chief content officer at MarketingProfs see empathy as key to all successful marketing efforts, whether they are of the B2B influencer marketing variety or more traditional approaches. “Start with empathy. Continue with utility. Improve with analysis. Optimize with love,” Ann has wisely suggested — advice that will well-serve marketers looking to embrace gratitude.

“Start with empathy. Continue with utility. Improve with analysis. Optimize with love.” — Ann Handley @MarketingProfs Click To Tweet

3 — Amisha Gandhi of SAP Ariba

Amisha Gandhi, vice president of influencer marketing and communications at SAP Ariba* has observed that co-creating content with influencers offers an array of advantages.

Amisha Gandhi of SAP Quote Image

“Working with influencers, to co-create content, delivers value and can inspire audiences to take action.” — Amisha Gandhi @AmishaGandhi Click To Tweet

4 — Tom Treanor of Arm Treasure Data

Tom Treanor

For Tom Treanor, global head of marketing at Arm Treasure Data*, B2B influencers make good sense in an array of content areas businesses may already be involved with, as he outlined recently in “How B2B Influencer Marketing Offers Brands an Ideal Alternative to In-Person Events.”

“Consider how you work with influencers in areas such as podcasts, webinars, live-streams, ebooks, blogs and social content. Are there ways that your marketing can be improved with the help of industry influencers?” @RtMixMktg Click To Tweet

5 — Ty Heath of LinkedIn

Ty Heath

Ty Heath, global lead of The B2B Institute at LinkedIn*, sees the power of B2B influencer marketing in building ongoing relationships, especially helpful for breaking through the noise in light of rising content attention deficit.

LinkedIn Ty Heath Quote Image

“People can break through the noise. People trust people. Influence is about relationships.” — Ty Heath @tyrona Click To Tweet

6 — Lee Odden of TopRank Marketing

Our own CEO and co-founder Lee Odden has been instrumental in the development and growth of the practice of B2B influencer marketing, and has long seen its multiple advantages for not just brands and influencers, but also B2B buyers.

“When planned and implemented effectively, B2B influencer marketing programs build trust and confidence for buyers, influencers and the brand.” — Lee Odden @LeeOdden Click To Tweet

7 — Tamara McCleary of Thulium

Tamara McCleary

Tamara McCleary, CEO at Thulium, sees the power of long-term, ongoing marketing efforts — especially when these types of always-on programs are applied to B2B influencer marketing.

“A long-term influencer program will allow your brand to create true brand advocates, powerful brand evangelists, and raving fans.” — Tamara McCleary @TamaraMcCleary Click To Tweet

8 — Ashley Zeckman of TopRank Marketing

Ashley Zeckman

Our own senior director of digital strategy Ashley Zeckman sees B2B influencer marketing as a great way to collaborate around ideas, and a more effective alternative than traditional one-way “buy this” approaches.

Rather than unapologetically telling us to buy a product, #B2B influencers are collaborating around an idea. – @azeckman #InfluencerMarketing Click To Tweet

9 — Konstanze Alex of Cisco Systems

Konstanze Alex

For Konstanze Alex, head of global digital storytelling at Cisco Systems, trust and relationship-building are key when it comes to working with B2B influencers.

“Regardless of which team at a brand engages with influencers, relationship and trust building should be a top priority” — Konstanze Alex @Konstanze Click To Tweet

10 —Joshua Nite of TopRank Marketing

Joshua Nite

Our own content marketing manager Joshua Nite recently shared his insight on how B2B marketers can best work with influencers during the global health crisis, and in “How to Nurture B2B Influencer Relationships During the Pandemic” he offered a smart take on the similarities between influencers and friendships.

“Influence relationships operate by much the same rules as any friendship: Get to know the person, don’t talk about yourself too much, give something before you ask for anything, and be sensitive to their emotions and needs.” @NiteWrites Click To Tweet

Walk Your B2B Influencer Marketing Walk

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Using the wise advice we’ve highlighted here from Rani, Ann, Amisha, Tom, Ty, Lee, Tamara, Konstanze, Ashley, and Joshua, you can walk your B2B influencer marketing walk with efforts that will take you on down the line to new heights in 2021 and beyond.

Whether you work with a top B2B influencer marketing agency such as TopRank Marketing or utilize your own team, now is an ideal time to reach B2B influencers and work together to drive digital brand conversations.

* Adobe, SAP Ariba, Arm Treasure Data, and LinkedIn are TopRank Marketing clients.